Reese Witherspoon, Kerry Washington Spark Drama in Hulu's 'Little Fires Everywhere'

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 13, 2020 | Go to article overview

Reese Witherspoon, Kerry Washington Spark Drama in Hulu's 'Little Fires Everywhere'


Byline: George Dickie Gracenote

An upscale suburban home goes up in flames, its residents watching in horror from the street. Police determine it was arson because of the presence of "Little Fires Everywhere."

And that opening scene provides not only the backdrop for the so-named miniseries based on Celeste Ng's bestselling novel that premieres Wednesday, March 18, on Hulu, but also a recurring theme.

Backtracking four months, the drama tells the story of the Richardsons, an upper-middle-class family in a leafy Cleveland suburb circa 1997. Elena (Reese Witherspoon) is the very embodiment of that privilege, an attractive, well-intentioned and well-ordered Type-A working as a part-time journalist at the local paper when she's not raising four kids with hubby Bill (Joshua Jackson) and exhorting them to play by the rules.

Her message of conformism is generally accepted without protest by offspring Lexie, Trip and Moody (Jade Pettyjohn, Jordan Elsass, Gavin Lewis), but the youngest, Izzy (Megan Stott), bucks her at every turn.

Into their lives come Mia Warren (Kerry Washington) and her teenage daughter Pearl (Lexi Underwood), who rent an apartment from Elena. Mia is a mixed-media artist who moves where the work is and takes odd jobs to pay the bills when there isn't any, while Pearl is just sick of their nomadic existence and wishes her mom would make her well-being the priority.

But Mia's main concern is, at least at the outset of the story, her art, which frequently incorporates fire and filming those scenes proved an interesting quandary for cast and crew, as Washington told a recent gathering of journalists in California. …

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