Celebrate Black History Month All over Chicago

By Vitello, Barbara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 18, 2000 | Go to article overview

Celebrate Black History Month All over Chicago


Vitello, Barbara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


With museums, cultural centers and concert halls throughout Chicagoland commemorating Black History Month, there may be no better time to explore your cultural heritage than now.

With exhibitions ranging from artistic to scientific and productions showcasing everything from African traditional to Detroit rhythm and blues, we're not kidding when we say that this year's Black History celebration offers something for everyone.

If museums are your thing: "To Conserve a Legacy: American Art from Historically Black Colleges and Universities," opens Feb. 26 at the Art Institute of Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago.

The first nationally touring exhibition of its kind showcases works by "black academy" members Henry Ossawa Tanner (dubbed the "dean of American black artists" by W.E.B. DuBois), Horace Pippin, collagist Romare Bearden, sculptor Edmonia Lewis, Elizabeth Catlett, Aaron Douglas (one of the Harlem Renaissance's most famous artists), primitivist William H. Johnson, Charles White and Hale Woodruff among others.

Rounding out this 100-year survey of American art are works by modernists Georgia O'Keefe, Marsden Hartley and Arthur G. Dove. The museum celebrates the opening of the exhibition with a free concert by the Fisk Jubilee Singers at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 26.

Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for children. (312) 443-3600 or www.artic.edu.

"Tracings: Out of the Africas," the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs' exploration of the customs and traditions of five regions in Africa continues with a performance by Mizizi Ya Utamaduni (or "roots of our nation") Tuesday at the Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington St. The ensemble performs traditional songs and poetry from Kenya and Uganda from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Cultural Center's Grand Army of the Republic Hall. The month-long program concludes Wednesday with the Bantabaa!, a West African welcoming ceremony featuring Georgia Sea Island Singers and a marketplace where local artisans display and sell their African- inspired crafts.

Wednesday's program also honors the men and women who died at Goree Island, Senegal, the westernmost point from which slaves were taken to the New World.

Admission to the Cultural Center events is free. (312) 346-3278 or www.ci.chi.il.us/Tourism/CulturalCenter/.

Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry observes Black History Month with the exhibition "Defying Tradition: African American Women in Science and Technology." The exhibition, which continues through March 5, salutes the female pioneers who broke down gender barriers in the fields of mathematics, engineering, science, communication and space technology.

Accompanying the exhibit is a West African dance performance by Ayodele (10:15 and 11:30 a.m. today); African folk tales (10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday) and ballet set to rap music (10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Feb. 28).

Lui Lui Satterfield, a former member of Earth, Wind & Fire and the Pharaohs and fellow former Pharoah, Warren Bingham perform at 2 p.m. Saturday in a concert featuring a dance tribute to Dr. Mae Jemison, the first black female astronaut.

Performances conclude Feb. 26 with a concert featuring Marlena Smalls and the Hallelujah Singers, an ensemble dedicated to preserving the traditions unique to the South Carolina Sea Islands. Show time is 2 p.m.

The museum is at 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive. Admission is $7 for adults, $3.50 for children (free on Tuesday). There's an additional fee for parking and Omnimax. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Celebrate Black History Month All over Chicago
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.