Metropolis Murals Classical Images Will Welcome Theater Goers

By Davis, Jon | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 25, 2000 | Go to article overview

Metropolis Murals Classical Images Will Welcome Theater Goers


Davis, Jon, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Now showing at Arlington Heights' new 21st century theater: a bit of Renaissance Europe.

As the box office opens today at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in downtown Arlington Heights, people buying tickets will be among the first to see three large murals linking Metropolis to European theater of the 15th and 16th centuries.

Like a theatrical build-up toward opening night, work on the box office will continue right up to today's 10 a.m. opening.

Bricklayers weren't expected to finish their work in front of the 111 W. Campbell St. entrance until late Monday. The last telephone won't be hooked up until mid-morning.

Metropolis has been selling tickets by telephone since last week. In the first week of sales, more than 5,000 tickets were sold, surpassing expectations.

Once open, the box office's hours will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or showtime, Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday).

"We're ready, it's just a question of whether the front entranceway is ready," said Alan Salzenstein, Metropolis' executive director.

Metropolis' coming-out party begins Wednesday with a "sneak peak" for members of the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce. The official ribbon-cutting is Friday, when the Metropolis Youth Symphony makes its public debut, with guest clarinetist and Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder.

Mulder, who said she hadn't played clarinet in 40 years until she recently picked it up to practice for her solo, will join the 79-member orchestra, directed by Robert Ian Winstin and composed of Northwest suburban teens and pre-teens. She'll play during Gershwin's "Prelude No. 2. …

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