Ware Promoted, Will Stay at Coke

By Roby, Hersch | Black Enterprise, May 2000 | Go to article overview

Ware Promoted, Will Stay at Coke


Roby, Hersch, Black Enterprise


In wake of legal problems, soft drink company holds on to top executive

Nearly two months after his surprising retirement announcement, Carl H. Ware, the highest-ranking black executive at the Coca-Cola Co., has reconsidered his decision. He has opted to head the corporation's new international public and governmental affairs division.

Coke President and COO Douglas Daft made the announcement in January while praising Ware for his service to the company. Ware was to depart the Atlanta-based beverage company at the end of 2000, but will now remain as senior manager of the new Global Public Affairs and Administration division.

"I'm delighted by this new opportunity to serve the company to which I've devoted 26 years," Ware said in a statement.

Currently senior vice president and president of the company's African operations group, Ware is expected to be elected executive vice president by the company's board of directors. The 56-year-old Ware will be responsible for global communications, government relations, corporate external affairs and corporate services--the day-to-day operation of facilities that include those in Atlanta, New York and Washington, D.C. In his new position, Ware will maintain strategic oversight of African operations once a new group president is named.

"Carl's principal role is to ensure that the Coca-Cola Co. continues to be welcome around the world, and that we apply `community' and `neighbor' equally to those who live next door or on the next continent," said Daft when making the announcement. "We must think locally and act locally, and no one understands that better than Carl."

Immediate reaction from industry analysts suggested that retaining Ware would boost the embattled company, which is embroiled in controversy both abroad and domestically.

Most recently, France blocked Coke's $733 million offer to take over Orangina drink products, citing the threat of monopoly, and Italy fined Coke $16. …

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