Sentencing and Corrections: Exploring Major Issues

By Travis, Jeremy; Meachum, Larry | Corrections Today, April 2000 | Go to article overview

Sentencing and Corrections: Exploring Major Issues


Travis, Jeremy, Meachum, Larry, Corrections Today


Corrections in America today is fragmented and fracturing. There is no longer a "standard approach." What seems at first glance to be a nearly monolithic set of tough-on-crime policies is really illusory. Some states have abolished parole, but some retain it. Some have presumptive sentencing guidelines, while others have a voluntary system. In a climate favorable to determinate sentencing, the indeterminate approach remains widespread. What's more, policies developed in the get-tough climate are being challenged by new approaches based on premises that do not share the assumptions of our current, essentially retributive system of justice.

With such a complex picture, it is not easy to discern the goals of sentencing policy. The people who develop and carry out these policies are acutely aware that what happens in sentencing and corrections has enormous consequences, not only for resource allocation but also -- more fundamentally -- for the quality of justice and for public safety. The size of the population under some form of correctional supervision, now approaching 5.9 million, is the most obvious consequence. Helping policymakers sort out the salient issues could go a long way to maximize their effectiveness.

The Issues

To help policy-makers decide if there is a better way to think about sentencing and corrections, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Justice Department, along with the Justice Department's Corrections Program Office (CPO), has been holding a series of "executive sessions" to discuss these issues. The goal of the five sessions, which began in 1998 and continue into this year, is to explore the purposes and functions of sentencing and corrections and their interdependence.

Practitioners and prominent scholars, who represent a broad cross section of points of view, come together in the sessions to examine a vast array of issues, including the decline of indeterminate sentencing, the erosion of judicial discretion, the eclipse of parole boards and the increased attention paid to risk-based sentencing. They also look at whether it is possible to reduce disparity in sentencing while accommodating differently situated offenders, how the imperative of public safety can be reconciled with the need for offender rehabilitation, how to deal with the "re-entry" process and whether the justice system adequately provides for participation by victims and affected communities.

Fruits of the Discussions

To get the results of the discussions into the hands of the people who can use them as soon as possible, NIJ and the CPO have released the first four papers from the sessions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sentencing and Corrections: Exploring Major Issues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.