Kennedy's Story of Her Assault: New Details of What a Woman General Told Friends about a Case of Abuse in the Pentagon

By Vistica, Gregory | Newsweek, May 8, 2000 | Go to article overview

Kennedy's Story of Her Assault: New Details of What a Woman General Told Friends about a Case of Abuse in the Pentagon


Vistica, Gregory, Newsweek


The briefing was over and Maj. Gen. Claudia Kennedy, one of the highest-ranking women in the U.S. Army, extended her hand to Brig. Gen. Larry Smith. Kennedy and Smith were alone in Kennedy's Pentagon office, although the door was open and Kennedy's assistant was sitting just outside. Smith ignored the proffered handshake and pulled Kennedy into his arms, holding her so tightly she couldn't move. Then he forcibly thrust his tongue into her mouth. Kennedy thought about kicking Smith between the legs, but didn't. She finally struggled free from Smith, so shocked and angry she was unable to speak. Smith turned on his heel and walked out. Shaken, Kennedy went to her bathroom and washed her mouth out several times. Then she went home and took a long shower, still furious at what she considered a case of sexual assault.

That at least is what Kennedy has told friends about the incident, which allegedly took place in 1996. Neither Kennedy nor Smith has spoken publicly about the incident, and both declined requests to tell their story for the record. Officially, the Army refuses to confirm or deny that Smith is under investigation, although sources say a probe will be completed soon. No one thinks the investigators will have an easy time substantiating Kennedy's allegations, which friends and colleagues related to NEWSWEEK for the first time. Despite published reports that she complained about the incident at the time, Pentagon sources say they are now sure she never lodged a formal complaint. "It's a 'he said, she said' sort of thing," said a woman officer who is Kennedy's friend.

One key reason she didn't report it, friends say, is that Kennedy did not want to embarrass the Army. Kennedy knew plenty about the Army's woman problem. She served on a high-profile Army panel on sexual harassment, and in press reports before the incident, she said she'd experienced sexual harassment several times in her career. Still, Kennedy was reluctant to file formal charges against Smith. "I dealt with it," she told friends later. "It never happened again."

Then last August Smith was picked to become the Army's deputy inspector general, a post in which he would have supervised investigations of sexual-harassment complaints. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kennedy's Story of Her Assault: New Details of What a Woman General Told Friends about a Case of Abuse in the Pentagon
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.