Thus Said


"Technology without the power of discernment is a dangerous thing: That's why skepticism may greet President Clinton's plan to bring computer technology into high schools that lack it, so that students can study subjects that include basic keyboarding and computer repair[ldots]. Let's hope that the next step will be to restore library materials and librarians to our decimated school libraries, so that students can learn the difference between information and knowledge in their study of science, art, and history." ELLEN KAUFMAN, in a letter to the editor, The New York Times, February 9.

"Announce a nine-month-long 'reading tour' of New York State, to be conducted entirely inside the Chappaqua Public Library. Go there every day and immerse yourself in books about the state. While Mr. Giuliani appears on the evening news assailing his latest enemy, the producers will have no choice but to show you calmly poring over historical tomes." Advice to New York Senatorial candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton from New York Times columnist JOHN TIERNEY, February 2.

"The message of these campaigns is simple: 'Your friends, neighbors and family members who work at the library have allowed it to become a haven for perverts and a hangout for pedophiles. The library won't be safe until we've driven out the devil technology."' PAUL McMASTERS, First Amendment ombudsman, The Freedom Forum Online (www.freedomforum.org), commenting on the unsuccessful initiative to force the district library in Holland, Michigan, to restrict Internet access for minors or face funding cuts (see p. 18).

"As library funding gets cut, online libraries just get richer: Versaware recently raised $25 million in financing and is headed toward the IPO [initial public offering] finish line." M. J. ROSE, "A Library in Every Dorm Room," Wired News online, February 24.

"At the library, we're not seeing anything but the traditional book format. There is absolutely no sign of a lack of devotion to the book itself[ldots]. The more access people have, whether on the Web or on television, the more they turn to traditional forces[ldots]. plus, the eBook doesn't work in the bathtub. …

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