Waxing Images of Heroic Blacks

By Barnes, Denise | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 13, 2000 | Go to article overview

Waxing Images of Heroic Blacks


Barnes, Denise, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


BALTIMORE - When sculptor Maia Carroll walks through the doors of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in East Baltimore, she feels right at home.

The museum chronicles the history of blacks from Africa to the present day. Ms. Carroll has spent considerable time inside the three-story building creating likenesses of such black heroes as Shaka Zulu, an African warrior and military strategist.

"It's a sanctuary of empowerment for anyone from any walk of life. The African-American experience represented in the Great Blacks in Wax Museum exemplifies surmounting all odds," Ms. Carroll says. "I believe that's the kind of empowerment that we must infuse in children so that they will contribute to a higher level of humanity."

The museum at 1601-03 E. North Ave. was established 17 years ago by Joanne and Elmer Martin to stimulate interest in black history by revealing lesser-known and often neglected historical facts.

Another objective was to depict such leaders as W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington as inspirational role models for youths.

That motivational spirit impressed Ms. Carroll, 40, when she visited the museum seven years ago as a chaperon with her son Ryan's class. During the tour, she noticed a few of the historical figures needed some artistic attention.

"I've always focused on the human form and illustrating portraiture but was never quite satisfied with rendering the so-called background. Sculpting allows me to approach the human form in a focused way," she says. "That satisfies my need to artistically celebrate the genius of the human form." Because the museum is a unique venue, Ms. Carroll says she felt uniquely qualified to lend a hand.

The Takoma Park resident immediately offered her services as a sculptor to the Martins and subsequently was commissioned to work on a permanent installation.

She credits the Martins for their vision.

"Their strong presence and conviction to the museum assured me that I had found a rare sanctuary in which to uphold the epic power of African presence in North America," Ms. Carroll says. "I was one of a team of three artists who worked on a re-creation of a slave ship that would feature human cargo as well as artifacts used in the trade."

Ms. Carroll graduated in 1981 from the University of Maryland at College Park with a bachelor's degree in studio arts, which deals with drawing, painting with acrylics and oils, printing, color theory and sculpting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Waxing Images of Heroic Blacks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.