Australian Utopian Literature: An Annotated, Chronological Bibliography 1667-1999

By Sargent, Lyman Tower | Utopian Studies, Spring 1999 | Go to article overview

Australian Utopian Literature: An Annotated, Chronological Bibliography 1667-1999


Sargent, Lyman Tower, Utopian Studies


INTRODUCTION

SCHOLARSHIP ON UTOPIAN LITERATURE relies on, among other things, the tools of definition and bibliography. There are now a number of good examinations of conceptual and definitional questions (see Funke; Holscher; Levitas; Sargent 1994; and Suvin) and three well-known bibliographies of utopian literature (Lewis; Negley; and Sargent 1979 and 1988). But all these bibliographies have a weakness in common; they combine the utopias of all countries into one list. In order to begin to understand national differences in utopian literature, I have begun to take my bibliography apart and to explore three neglected utopian literatures, those of Australia, Canada (see the bibliography in this issue) and New Zealand (Sargent 1997).

The following is an incomplete (there is no such thing as a complete bibliography), annotated, chronological bibliography of utopian literature supplementary to my most recent bibliography, although only a few of the items here appear in that bibliography. Most of the material was published in Australia or was by an identifiable Australian author, but I have included a few items that were either set in Australia or in some other way connected to Australia.

All items include one or more location symbols at the end of the bibliographical entry as follows:

A        National Library of Australia
ATL      Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, NZ
AzU      University of Arizona Library
CLU      University of California, Los Angeles Library
CtY      Yale University Library
CU-I     University of California, Irvine Library
DLC      Library of Congress
GU       University of Georgia Library
HRC      Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin
ICU      University of Chicago Library
IEN      Northwestern University Library
IU       University of Illinois, Champagne Urbana Library
L        British Library
LLL      London Library
LTS      Lyman Tower Sargent, Personal Collection
M        Mitchell Library, Sydney
Merril   Judith Merril Collection, Toronto Public Library
MoU-St   University of Missouri-St. Louis Utopia Collection
NN       New York Public Library
NNC      Columbia University Library
NSW      State Library of New South Wales
NZ       National Library of New Zealand
O        Bodleian Library, Oxford
PC       Private Collection
PSt      Pennsylvania State University Library, Utopia Collection
S        University of Sydney Library
TxU      University of Texas Library
VUW      Victoria University of Wellington Library
WGA      General Assembly Library, Wellington, NZ
WiU      University of Wisconsin, Madison Library

Because there are innumerable errors in listings of library holdings, I include symbols only for those libraries where I actually read the book or from which I borrowed it on interlibrary loan. Multiple symbols are the result of going back to re-read a number of the items I found most interesting.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The assistance of Nan Bowman Albinski and Robyn Walton has been essential to compiling this bibliography. We do not agree on the inclusion or exclusion of all items, but I could not have done this work without their prior work (See items listed in the list of references). I also want to thank the staffs of the Mitchell Library and the National Library of Australia for their assistance. Time off for research provided by the University of Missouri-St. Louis made the work possible.

Today no bibliographer can work without the services of interlibrary loan, and the University of Missouri-St. Louis has provided an excellent ILL department, led by Mary Zettwock.

Raffaella Baccolini copy-edited the manuscript and discussed many concerns with me. The final result has been much improved by her work. In particular a number of anomalies that entered my bibliographies as they evolved over the years have been corrected in this one.

REFERENCES

Albinski, Nan Bowman. …

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