Who's Who

By Threadgill, Susan | The Washington Monthly, May 2000 | Go to article overview

Who's Who


Threadgill, Susan, The Washington Monthly


If Al Gore wins, Justice Antonin Scalia may resign from the Supreme Court, because he feels "a Gore presidency will eliminate his chance of becoming Chief Justice," writes the Washingtonian's Kim Eisler. Eisler adds that Scalia, as the father of nine, also would like to earn more than the $167,900 a year paid Supreme Court justices.

The stories about Skull and Bones, George W. Bush's secret society at Yale, are getting juicier and juicier. The New York Observer's Ron Rosenbaum says that one of the society's rituals requires members to lie down in coffins and reveal all about their sex lives. This understandably does not sit too well with their wives and girlfriends. As one of them put it to Rosenbaum, "I objected to 14 guys knowing whether I was a good lay."

Bill Clinton cannot be comforted by the news that Ken Starr's replacement, Robert Ray, got his start courtesy of Hillary Clinton's dear friend Rudolph Giuliani, not to mention the fact that Ray is adding to his staff of prosecutors--including one from the staff of Representative Dan Burton, whom even The New York Times concedes is "one of Mr. Clinton's severest critics?

Remember how D.C.'s former Mayor Marion Barry was away on a Super Bowl junket when a snowstorm paralyzed Washington? Well this March, just as citizen discontent with torn-up streets was peaking, and people were asking where was Anthony Williams, our current mayor was located in Paris. Also in Paris recently was Office of Personnel Management Director Janice Lachance who you will recall was found campaigning for Al Gore when the most recent Washington snowstorm shut down the federal government. France hasn't been her only stop since Iowa. She's also been to Israel and China. They're never going to be able to say her approach to administration is too hands-on.

The McLaughlin Group, once King of the Hill of Washington talk shows, has fallen on hard times. Its ratings are down 40 percent in the last five years. Eleanor Clift is the only old hand left on the panel. Jack Germond, Fred Barnes, Pat Buchanan, Robert Novak, and Morton Kondracke have all departed. "Germond was the critical loss," a veteran observer tells us. "His common sense and humor provided a balance wheel of sanity for all the bluster and bickering."

Speaking of Pat Buchanan, last month Bill Clinton told the radio and television correspondents dinner that Elian Gonzalez is "the one immigrant Buchanan wants to keep in America."

Who is the richest person in Congress? You guess Jay Rockefeller? Wrong. The wealthiest is Rep. Amo Houghton. He may be worth $1.6 billion according to The Hill's John Kruger. …

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