Periodical Cruise Control

By Grenier, Cynthia | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

Periodical Cruise Control


Grenier, Cynthia, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Tom Cruise pretty much has a lock on magazine covers this month, although Russell ("Gladiator") Crowe comes close. Not coincidentally, of course, Mr. Cruise has a major movie opening soon - a sequel to the successful "Mission: Impossible" of a few years back.

Of the various publications featuring Mr. Cruise, the most in-depth look is in June's Vanity Fair, in which the actor does a question-and-answer session with director Cameron Crowe, who directed him in the popular "Jerry Maguire." Having gotten to know Mr. Cruise fairly well, Mr. Crowe is able to dig deeper and more knowledgeably than the casual interviewer. The result is a lengthy, probing, engaging, intimate portrait of a mega-star.

The article is supplemented by some splendidly moody, romantically glamorous photographs by Annie Leibovitz of Mr. Cruise with long hair and jeans.

* * *

GQ, a magazine devoted to manly subjects such as women and style, reflects the new trend of pushing female flesh ever more insistently in the reader's face while trying to maintain a certain decorum with regard to subject matter.

The May issue presents a young woman, breasts barely covered and hands tugging down on a very small bikini bottom, with the cover line, in very large type, "Estella Got Her Groove."

A special wealth section on "Why the Good Times Won't End Soon" includes such topics as "What You Should Earn at Your Age" and "NBA Seers and Spendthrifts."

* * *

On the female side of the news rack, check out the venerable, ever-successful monthly bible for nubile lasses: Cosmopolitan.

The cover reveals a novel turn. It's a double-spread item: Turn the page, and you see the cover model, bared to the waist (hands placed decorously, but it still gives a naughty spin for a woman's magazine).

What's more interesting - in fact, downright startling - is the report of a survey by Youth Intelligence, a market-research and trend-tracking firm in New York.

Some 68 percent of 3,000 married and single young women went on record to say they would ditch work if they could afford to. A follow-up Cosmo poll of 800 women produced similar results: Two out of three women surveyed said they would rather take it easy at home than climb the corporate ladder. Seventy percent said they would rather work fewer hours than make more money.

Does this mean we're going to see a housewife adorning a Cosmo cover one of these days? …

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