Clinton Tells Duma U.S. Wants Strong Russia, Urges Closer Ties

By Cain, Andrew | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Clinton Tells Duma U.S. Wants Strong Russia, Urges Closer Ties


Cain, Andrew, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


MOSCOW - President Clinton, in a historic speech to the Russian Duma, said yesterday that the United States supports a strong Russia and that an American missile-defense system should not be feared.

Mr. Clinton, the first U.S. president to address the Russian parliament, capped his fifth and likely final presidential trip to Moscow by urging Russia to embrace Western institutions and forge stronger ties with the United States.

"Many Russians still suspect that America does not wish you well," Mr. Clinton told 400 lawmakers listening to a translation on headphones in the lower house of the Russian parliament.

As a result, Russians assume "that every assertion of American power must diminish Russia, and every assertion of Russian strength must threaten America," Mr. Clinton said.

"That is not true. America wants a strong Russia," Mr. Clinton said.

Legislators gave Mr. Clinton a restrained but respectful reception. They never interrupted Mr. Clinton's remarks with applause, but clapped politely at the end of his 45-minute address. Perhaps 60 seats in the chamber were empty.

Ultranationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky, who sought Russia's presidency in 1996, heckled Mr. Clinton from the chamber's 14th row. Mr. Clinton hesitated for a beat at the outset of his speech, as Mr. Zhirinovsky grumbled aloud, saying "Shame, shame," in Russian.

At the end of Mr. Clinton's address, Mr. Zhirinovsky yelled at legislators who applauded Mr. Clinton.

"Why are you applauding for him?" Mr. Zhirinovsky shouted in Russian. Inviting Mr. Clinton to the Duma was "a waste of time," he said.

Mr. Zhirinovsky later told reporters that Mr. Clinton should pull U.S. troops out of Yugoslavia and should not intervene in Russian affairs.

On Sunday, Mr. Clinton and Russian President Vladimir Putin failed to reach an accord on a nuclear missile defense system. But they agreed each country would scuttle 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium, enough for thousands of nuclear weapons.

Mr. Clinton and Mr. Putin also agreed to create an early-warning center in Moscow jointly staffed by U.S. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Clinton Tells Duma U.S. Wants Strong Russia, Urges Closer Ties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.