Impact of Student Pharmacists Teaching a Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Class

By Manigault, Kendra R.; Augustine, Jill M. et al. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, March 2020 | Go to article overview

Impact of Student Pharmacists Teaching a Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Class


Manigault, Kendra R., Augustine, Jill M., Thurston, Maria Miller, American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


INTRODUCTION

Pharmacy as a profession today is striving towards attainment of provider status, as the services that pharmacists can provide have expanded well beyond the role of dispensing medications. (1) Therefore, there is a clear need within schools and colleges of pharmacy to train confident and competent future practitioners to take the lead in providing novel patient care services. Such services often involve direct interaction with patients as well as providing consultative and educational services to patients as part of the interdisciplinary team. (2) Furthermore, the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 supports the development of clinical knowledge and incorporation of experiences with a "patient care emphasis" within advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). (3)

There are 30.3 million people living with diabetes in the United States. (4) Patients with diabetes benefit from pharmacy-provided information to improve their disease state control and health outcomes. The American Diabetes Association's (ADA's) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2019 guidelines cites diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) as a key element of diabetes management. The guideline recommends that health care professionals be involved in providing patient-centered DSMES to all patients living with diabetes. (5) Additionally, the ADA guidelines endorse pharmacists as an integral provider of DSMES.

Students within Mercer University College of Pharmacy traditionally complete their diabetes coursework within the Endocrinology module during their third professional year, as well as in the first-year Clinical Skills and Simulation Laboratory. Additionally, students have the opportunity to participate in a diabetes elective during their third-professional year. Fourth-year students completing a traditional five-week faculty-precepted ambulatory care APPE receive a diabetes topic discussion during week one of the APPE block and are heavily engaged in patient/provider interactions involving patients with diabetes throughout the remainder of the rotation. Although there are ample opportunities for students to provide education in a one-on-one setting during the APPEs for the study site, no experiences are currently provided that are focused on educational teaching and facilitation in the small group format. On average, students are involved in the care of 15-30 patients with diabetes per month, during which they deliver direct patient education. Teaching the DSMES class (intervention in this study) allowed student pharmacists to actively apply their knowledge of diabetes and communication skills previously gained within the classroom and introductory experiential settings in a small-group classroom setting with actual patients. Additional practice providing patient education potentially enhances student ability and confidence in providing DSMES.

To successfully teach a patient, a health care provider must first become knowledgeable and proficient in the topic themselves. (6) There is evidence that a variety of educational experiences (eg, certificate programs, elective courses, APPE "patient navigator" training, diabetes-focused APPEs) can positively impact a student pharmacist's knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills associated with diabetes or other chronic conditions. (6-16) However, we found only one study that evaluated students confidence with diabetes knowledge and education after teaching a DSMES class. (6) While that study, which was conducted by Shrader and colleagues, was similar in design to ours, it involved third-year pharmacy students within an elective service-learning course rather than fourth-year APPE students. Additionally, the study did not include a control group or a comprehensive measure of change in student knowledge (only one question involving perceived confidence in knowledge was assessed). Therefore, we concluded that additional investigation was warranted involving hard measures of student knowledge as a result of facilitating a DSMES class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Impact of Student Pharmacists Teaching a Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Class
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.