Hello from the Other Side: Social Studies Faculty Teaching Biography within State History Courses

By Southall, Aubrey B.; Bradshaw, Lauren Y. | The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Sciences, January 2020 | Go to article overview

Hello from the Other Side: Social Studies Faculty Teaching Biography within State History Courses


Southall, Aubrey B., Bradshaw, Lauren Y., The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Sciences


September 2019

Introduction

This paper explores the opinions and interests of pre-service social studies students at two universities enrolled in a state history course taught by a social studies education faculty member. A Midwestern private university (site one) and a Southern public university (site two) were the sites for data collection. Findings include similar motivation for learning state history and opinions on interactive history lessons, while showcasing different interests in historic figures. Heroification was a common theme from both sites as researchers were unable to combat hagiography. As the multi-site case study is longitudinal in nature, the courses in the study have been changed due to feedback and course assignments.

Objectives or purposes:

The purpose of this research study is to evaluate pre-service social studies teachers' opinions and interests in regards to biographical figures in their state history course. The study will answer two questions: (1) What are social studies education students' opinions about studying state history? (2) What state historical figures are social studies education students most interested in?

Perspectives/ Subjectivities

The theory that informs our research is intersectionality, which Caroline Eick explores in her article "Oral Histories of Education and the Relevance of Theory: Claiming New Spaces in a Post Revisionist Era" Eick (2011) notes that intersectionality (which was thoroughly examined by the theorist Patricia Hill Collins in her work Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and Politics of Empowerment) offers researchers a means to acknowledge that their identity falls into many categories, which may help or hinder their research. The theory of intersectionality is an important consideration for historical researchers. In our research, our identities and intersectionalities have created a means for us to gather information and data. Our roles as a white females, mothers, daughters, students, teachers, and professors have all lent to the collection of materials for our educational study and the analyses that we have created. Which leads to the question of how successful might researchers with different intersectionalities in be in recreating the same study? Would they have been able to produce the same analysis?

As PhD students, both authors explored ideas of biography and bias within our own research. These personal histories and experiences followed us in our positions as first year tenure track professors. After graduating, we were in strangely symmetrical situations. Both first year professors, with an extensive background in social studies pedagogy and biographical research, teaching a mixture of pre-service and history majors in state history courses at our new institutional homes. We immediately began planning our courses together. We shared ideas on daily activities, out of classroom experiences, and major assignments.

Lauren's new position was at a university in a rural area of Georgia, very different from the urban environment that she had been working in for over a decade. As a lifelong resident of Georgia, and a former middle school Georgia History teacher, Lauren felt prepared for her new position. Lauren's doctoral research had been based in Georgia, and her biggest hurdle was to quickly gather age-appropriate primary and secondary readings for her 3000 level Georgia history course. Aubrey landed a position out of state. As a new resident to Midwest, Aubrey found herself teaching Illinois history for the first time to many state residents. Unlike Georgia history, Illinois history is not taught in a standalone class at the secondary level. Illinois history is impeded into United States history. As an outsider, Aubrey was cautious to how she approached Illinois corruption. As a former Georgian, she had encountered opposition to teaching past faults of the state, for example the Trail of Tears, Civil War causes, and Jim Crow. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hello from the Other Side: Social Studies Faculty Teaching Biography within State History Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.