Aspects: A Grand Life in the Pink; When It Comes to Rose, There Ain't Nothing like the Dame, Says Fashion Editor Carole Ann Rice

By Rice, Carole Ann | The Birmingham Post (England), June 12, 2000 | Go to article overview

Aspects: A Grand Life in the Pink; When It Comes to Rose, There Ain't Nothing like the Dame, Says Fashion Editor Carole Ann Rice


Rice, Carole Ann, The Birmingham Post (England)


This is a homage to the late Barbara Cartland. She of the pink tulle and floral prose whose virginal heroines tossed their hair and flashed their eyes at cruel but fundamentally decent counts and princes.

She of the Pekinese pups and vitamin mountains who did for fashion what Larry Grayson did for machismo.

This chaise longue prophet, who would have had modern woman hanging up her career so that men could enjoy their birthright reign of the jobs market, was one of a kind. So what that she thought that a wife at the sink, peeling sprouts for her man was the answer to all social ills? The British love their eccentrics as much as their morning cuppa.

We entertained her often bizarre and off-the-wall theories and recollections. That she had been proposed to some 22 times before marrying at the age of 21, had a Birmingham street named after her and had the body of a teenager, she once told me when well into her 90s, beneath the layers of her fuchsia garb. The police are still making enquiries.

But seriously though, having once had an audience with the great Dame, one thing I can vouch for and that is she knew a thing or two about glamour. She was an icon for all of us women who wouldn't even put a dustbin out without a lick of lipstick or a spritz of perfume.

Glamour is too often considered a rude word in an age where mascara can be thought of as a political statement. So she wore her inch-long lashes, green eye make up and pink modes 30 years after some sink into the support tights and greyness of post menopausal womanhood.

By sheer coincidence, pink in all its many hues is big news for spring/summer 2000 fashion. Hot cerise is the pinnacle of cool if you can take it and if you can, it definitely leaves them shaken and stirred. …

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