MATHmatazz Kit

By Hornyak, AnneMarie | Teaching Children Mathematics, April 2000 | Go to article overview

MATHmatazz Kit


Hornyak, AnneMarie, Teaching Children Mathematics


MATHmatazz Kit, K-2, 1998. Hand puppets, videotapes, activity guide with blackline masters, game-boards, teaching notes, paperback books, $146.04. Scott, Foresman & Co., P. 0. Box 2649, 4350 Equity Dr., Columbus, OH 43216, (800) 552-2259.

MATHmatazz is a multimedia kit consisting of videotapes, books, puppets, puppet skits, and games. It is designed to be used with the textbook series Scott-Foreman--Addison-Wesley MATH for the introduction of chapters, the reinforcement of concepts, or the review of skills. However, it could be used to supplement other mathematics programs.

The MATHmatazz components were designed by the Children's Television Network. The kit under review was intended for use with first graders. It includes multiple copies of four read-aloud books covering such mathematics concepts as reading and analyzing graphs, skip counting, recognizing fractional parts, comparing sizes of objects, and measuring length using nonstandard units. The illustrations in each book are very appealing. The text is presented through rhyme, so children love to read along and reread these books. Extension activities are listed at the end of each book.

Other components of the kit include four interactive videotapes introducing and reviewing such key mathematical ideas as missing addends, grouping by tens and ones, counting on and back, and identifying different coins and their values. …

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