Poll: College Students Seek Talk of Morality, Patriotism

By Billups, Andrea | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Poll: College Students Seek Talk of Morality, Patriotism


Billups, Andrea, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


U.S. college students say more talk about morality is needed on campuses, as well as discussion about basic American freedoms, a new Zogby poll has found.

Nearly a third of the nation's college students declined to say they are proud to be Americans.

These are the latest findings of a new poll released this month by Zogby International, which paints a gloomy portrait of student attitudes toward patriotism, just as Americans are gearing up to celebrate Independence Day on July 4.

The random survey of 1,005 college students was taken in January on behalf of the Foundation for Academic Standards and Tradition (FAST), a nonprofit student advocacy group with headquarters in New York City.

It found that an overwhelming majority of college students want more talk about morality on campuses, as well as more discussion about basic American freedoms.

"There seems to be a growing movement toward what one would call more traditional principles," FAST President Marc Berley said.

"That's what students want and that's not what they are getting."

Stanley K. Ridgley, executive director of the Collegiate Network at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute in Wilmington, Del., said colleges would be wise to listen to students.

Colleges, he said, don't do enough to teach the basis of a free society, but never fail to teach what is wrong, creating dissatisfaction where none exists, and "focusing on the warts to the exclusion of the healthy body politic."

"This denigration of the idea of American exceptionalism goes hand in hand with the poor job that colleges are doing teaching young people about what it means to be an American," he said.

"We live in the freest society that has ever existed, but apparently American intellectuals have a problem with that. For them, American history is a grim chronicle of oppression, and the idea that this is a free society that has provided more opportunity and wealth for more people doesn't jibe with their own ideas of America being an oppressive society."

The Zogby poll of students looked at other issues such as racism, job preparation, studying versus partying, and morality. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Poll: College Students Seek Talk of Morality, Patriotism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.