Levi Profits, Genocide, Appeasement and Terror

By Beichman, Arnold | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 25, 2000 | Go to article overview

Levi Profits, Genocide, Appeasement and Terror


Beichman, Arnold, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


When Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski declared martial law in Poland 20 years ago, the Wall Street Journal quoted a New York banker as saying: "Who knows what political system works? The only test we care about is: Can they pay their bills ?"

What the banker was saying with a rather callous attitude toward a great democratic movement is that banks, like any other capitalist institutions, were not in the business of reforming society; their duty was to their stockholders and their clientele. The streets of Seattle with its protesters against the World Trade Organization and the AFL-CIO battle against the China trade pact make it clear that things have changed dramatically. No banker would publicly dare to make such a statement today.

Levi's Children: Coming to Terms with Human Rights in the Global Marketplace (Atlantic Monthly Press, $25, 288 pages) by Karl Schoenberger primarily concerns itself with the problems for Levi Strauss and other American corporations in the age of economic globalization. The wages and working conditions of workers in Asia, who make the Levis we wear and the other myriad imports which flood our markets at prices which few domestic producers can match, is the author's concern.

Mr. Schoenberger believes that, "true success in business involves much more than just seeking profits." He writes too floridly for my taste but his report on a burgeoning world problem makes this a book worth reading.

* * *

Since the 1938 Adolf Hitler-Neville Chamberlain failed negotiations one of the dirtiest words in the English language has been "appeasement." For a politician/statesman the label "appeaser" has connoted someone who, wittingly or unwittingly, sold out to Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union. Yet, argues Stephen R. Rock in Appeasement in International Politics (University Press of Kentucky, $29.95, 256 pages) there are occasions when appeasement of an adversary, potential or actual, makes good sense.

Winston Churchill told the House of Commons on Feb. 27, 1945: "I know of no Government which stands to its obligations, even in its own despite, more solidly than the Russian Soviet government." That was appeasement by oratory since Soviet treaty diplomacy starting with Brest-Litovsk contradicted Churchill. Perhaps it could be argued that one man's appeasement may be another's statecraft.

The author has selected five case histories - British appeasement of the United States 1896-1903; British appeasement of Germany, 1936-1939; Anglo-American appeasement of the Soviet Union 1942-1945; U.S. appeasement of Iraq, 1989-1990 and U.S. appeasement of North Korea, 1988-1994 - which lead him to what he calls a "theory of appeasement." What Mr. Rock leaves unsaid is that appeasement by democratic states of each other may be acceptable because they share the same values, while appeasement of dictatorships may be fruitless, as with Saddam Hussein, and even dangerous, as with North Korea.

* * *

There were a number of South African journalists in the days of apartheid who were among the bravest of the brave amidst an omnipresent police terrorism. Benjy Pogrund, a reporter and editor of the now-defunct Rand Daily Mail, was one of them. All that South Africa's Special Branch could do to me, an American journalist, after my first and only tour was reject my visa application when Sen. Robert F. Kennedy asked me to accompany him on a South African tour.

But what Special Branch could do and did to journalists like Mr. Pogrund and those who once worked for the Rand Daily Mail is part of the gripping story told in War of Words: Memoir of a South African Journalist, Seven Stories Press, $26.95, 400 pages). It is a tale of how South Africa emerged from the hell of apartheid.

The 20th-century history of South Africa is an important part of the history of the continent south of the Sahara. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Levi Profits, Genocide, Appeasement and Terror
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.