From Newtonian toward Quantum Imaginations: Volume 1: Unriddling the Quantum Enigma

By Tamdgidi, Mohammad H. | Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, Winter 2020 | Go to article overview

From Newtonian toward Quantum Imaginations: Volume 1: Unriddling the Quantum Enigma


Tamdgidi, Mohammad H., Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge


About the Author

Previous books by Mohammad H. Tamdgidi

Advancing Utopistics: The Three Component Parts and Errors of Marxism (Routledge/Paradigm, 2007)

Gurdjieff and Hypnosis: A Hermeneutic Study (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009)

Mohammad-Hossein (a.k.a. 'Behrooz') Tamdgidi (pronounced "tamjidi") is the founder of OKCIR: Omar Khayyam Center for Integrative Research in Utopia, Mysticism, and Science (Utopystics), and its research and teaching publication, Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge (ISSN: 1540-5699) which have served since 2002 to frame his independent research, pedagogical, and publishing initiatives. Formerly an associate professor of sociology specializing in social theory at UMass Boston, he has previously taught sociology at SUNY-Binghamton and SUNY-Oneonta.

Tamdgidi's areas of scholarly and practical interest are the sociology of self- knowledge, human architecture, and utopystics--three fields of inquiry he invented in his doctoral studies and has since pursued as respectively intertwined theoretical, methodological and applied fields of inquiry altogether contributing to what he calls the quantum sociological imagination. His research, teaching, and publications have been framed by an interest in understanding how world-historical social structures and personal selves constitute one another. This line of inquiry has itself been a result of his longstanding interest in understanding the underlying causes of failures of the world's utopian, mystical, and scientific movements in bringing about a just global society.

Tamdgidi holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in sociology in conjunction with a graduate certificate in Middle Eastern studies from Binghamton University (SUNY). He received his B.A. in architecture from U.C. Berkeley, following enrollment as an undergraduate student of civil engineering in the Technical College of the University of Tehran, Iran. In Dec. 2013 he retired early from his tenured and promoted position at UMass Boston in order to pursue his independent scholarship in quantum sociological imagination and its application in Khayyami studies through the conduit of his research center, OKCIR.

For

Albert Einstein, whose humble genius still unriddles his blunders

"With fame I become more and more stupid, which of course is a very common phenomenon" (Dec. 24, 1919)--Albert Einstein

   Happy at heart is he who was never renowned,
   Did not himself with frocks, wool cloaks, or drapes surround,
   Phoenix-like flew to the peak empyrean sphere,
   Unlike owl flew not in this world's ruins aground.

--Omar Khayyam (Tamdgidi translation)

In celebration of the imminent millennium of the birth of Omar Khayyam, the author of the Robaiyat

In seeking an integrated theory, the intellect cannot rest contentedly with the assumption that there are two distinct fields, totally independent of each other by their nature.

--Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.

--Niels Bohr (1885-1962)

... atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts.

--Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976)

I don't like it, and I'm sorry I ever had anything to do with it.

--Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961)

I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.

--Richard Feynman (1918-1988)

If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.

--John A. Wheeler (1911-2008)

Quantum mechanics makes absolutely no sense.

---Roger Penrose (1931-)

Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job of interpreting quantum theory was done 50 years ago.

--Murray Gell-Mann (1929-2019)

One is amazed to see how different the world looks when it is no longer viewed through Cartesian spectacles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

From Newtonian toward Quantum Imaginations: Volume 1: Unriddling the Quantum Enigma
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.