Internet Security

By Amberg, Elizabeth | T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), June 2000 | Go to article overview

Internet Security


Amberg, Elizabeth, T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)


Norton's Internet Security 2000 software encompasses Norton AntiVirus, and monitors the Internet to help protect users' security and privacy. The software provides a firewall between a computer and the Internet in order to filter connections and data transmissions, so that unauthorized remote parties cannot view files from the user's computer, and information cannot leave the user's computer without his or her permission. The software prevents ActiveX and Java programs from running without the user's knowledge, and prohibits confidential information from being stored on insecure Web sites. Internet Security 2000 can block users from accessing secure sites where they may be asked for personal information, and can block cookies and other information a browser may report to Web sites.

We were pleased with the program's modularity and multiple options. A single computer can be set with different settings for each user who logs on. Users can choose from three different levels of security and privacy, depending on their individual needs. An ad-blocking option prevents most pictorial ads from being displayed, saving download time and preventing distractions. A parental control option lets parents or teachers restrict access to any or all of a number of Web site categories, such as crime, violence, gambling, entertainment, or interactive chats.

We found the security and privacy features to work well, and function smoothly. The software alerts us to free updates of virus protection, and an event log keeps records of every function that Internet Security has performed. A statistics window shows sets of statistics, such as the number of sites blocked and the number of bytes processed. The system is easily customizable, letting a user create his or her own rules for the firewall. …

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