Off Camera, the Serious Side to Gay Pride Events

By Allen, John L., Jr. | National Catholic Reporter, July 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Off Camera, the Serious Side to Gay Pride Events


Allen, John L., Jr., National Catholic Reporter


World gathering raises religious, human rights issues

While most of the world's news reports on World Pride 2000 have focused on predictable street theater -- drag queens, right-wing protests and dueling barbs emanating from Vatican officials and gay rights activists -- the more intriguing aspects of this first-ever global gay pride festival have taken place in relative quiet inside a Roman hotel.

There, past a substantial police cordon outside, a series of lectures and panel discussions have provided insight into the civil and religious forces shaping the lives of gays and lesbians around the world. For observers used to thinking of "gay pride" as an American phenomenon, the July 1-9 World Pride gathering has given the movement a distinctly international stamp.

The event has also surfaced some of the tensions within Roman Catholicism over homosexuality as a handful of Catholic speakers have voiced gay-friendly views at odds with criticism streaming out of the Vatican. A July 3 session on religion and homosexuality, including gays and lesbians representing Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and other traditions in addition to Christianity, ended with a call for religious institutions to "respect, honor and celebrate gifts of sexual diversity." (See text at www.natcath.org under the heading "documents.")

In the most dramatic expression of Catholic disapproval, Pope John Paul II asked the controversial French Bishop Jacques Gaillot to withdraw at the last minute as the keynote speaker for that July 3 session. Gaillot honored the request, but made himself available to the media. (See accompanying story.)

Sponsored by a variety of gay and human rights groups, the World Pride festival has been in the works for three years. Initially it enjoyed the support of civic authorities in Rome. In recent months, however, the Vatican has pressured the city to either postpone the event or curtail it, charging that it is inappropriate to hold a gay pride festival in the middle of the church's Jubilee year.

The city eventually decided the event could go forward, but withdrew official sponsorship and funding.

Inside Rome's Hotel Cicerone, where most sessions have been held, polemics have largely given way to sober discussion of human rights and religious dimensions to lesbian and gay experience.

William Hernandez, who heads El Salvador's lone support network for gays and lesbians, told an opening news conference about harassment in his country. Some 28 homosexuals have been killed since 1998, Hernandez said, with only two cases investigated by the police. In both cases, the investigations were prompted by special circumstances. In one, the murder took place in front of a police officer; in the other, the victim was a U.S. citizen.

Marco DePonte of Italy's Amnesty International chapter cited such experiences to argue that gay rights are a matter of basic human rights.

Based on discussions here, this perspective may challenge some commonly held notions in the gay community. For example, Surina Khan, a Pakistani and president of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, said she rejects arguments that "reparative therapy" is a hoax. "Reparative therapy" refers to efforts to reverse one's homosexual orientation through a combination of psychotherapy and spiritual direction.

"I've met people who say that Jesus is more important to them than their sexuality, and I think we have to respect that," she said. "It is possible to be an ex-gay. In a human rights context, everyone has the right to claim and define their own sexuality."

Several presenters challenged the widely held belief that pressure for acceptance of homosexuality is a cultural export of morally relativistic Western nations. Nelson Ng of Hong Kong, for example, told the group that China has a long tradition of tolerance for diversity in sexual practice.

"If you ask me, what is my sexual orientation, I say it's like hunger -- sometimes I eat rice and sometimes I eat noodles," Ng said to laughter in the hall. …

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