Amusement Ride Injuries Up Sharply, Study Says Industry Disputes Federal Statistics

The Florida Times Union, August 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

Amusement Ride Injuries Up Sharply, Study Says Industry Disputes Federal Statistics


TOLEDO, Ohio -- It's a report that could frighten even the most fearless thrill-seeker: In the past four years, the number of injuries at the nation's amusement parks has nearly doubled.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission's annual study, released this week, found there were about 7,260 rider injuries last year at amusement parks, compared to 3,720 injuries in 1996. Add in fairs and carnivals, and there were 10,380 injuries last year.

"Thrill rides are supposed to give people the illusion of danger, not put them in danger," said Ann Brown, the commission's chairwoman.

Park operators disputed the findings and said the skyrocketing numbers were flawed.

The report, based on injuries that were serious enough to warrant emergency treatment, comes at a time when amusement parks have come under closer scrutiny.

Six people died last year on amusement park and carnival rides in the United States. Some lawmakers have proposed giving the government expanded authority to regulate all rides.

The commission now regulates rides that travel from site to site with carnivals and seasonal fairs. But regulation of roller coasters and other rides at amusement parks is left to states, more than a dozen of which lack inspection programs.

Amusement industry leaders say they have noticed no increase in injuries, and question the commission's findings. The number of injuries listed in the report is based on surveys taken at 100 hospitals across the nation.

"The whole thing is kind of curious," said John Graff, president of International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Amusement Ride Injuries Up Sharply, Study Says Industry Disputes Federal Statistics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.