Twelve Finalists for EVE Awards Women Bring Vision, Leadership into 2000

By Wells, Judy | The Florida Times Union, May 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

Twelve Finalists for EVE Awards Women Bring Vision, Leadership into 2000


Wells, Judy, The Florida Times Union


The three EVEs of 2000 will be leaders who can follow, achievers who inspire others and visionaries who are not afraid to tackle the impossible.

They will be chosen from finalists in each of three areas, Education, Volunteer Service and Employment. Winners will be announced June 16 at the EVE Awards luncheon at the Prime Osborn Convention Center. Educator, author, radio commentator and storyteller Lorraine Johnson-Coleman will be keynote speaker.

Here are brief profiles of the finalists, by category.

EDUCATION

SYLVIA MCDONALD JOHNSON

Principal Sylvia McDonald Johnson transformed West Jacksonville Elementary School from a "D" rating to what the accreditation committee for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools referred to as "one of the best kept secrets in Jacksonville."

She built partnerships with the University of North Florida College of Education and Human Services to give her teachers access to more resources and to give student teachers a positive experience in an inner-city school. She found letter-writing mentors from the business community for each fourth-grader to help students with their writing skills.

After-school programs introduce students and their families to computer skills, parenting classes and literacy programs. Home visits are made to any student with unexplained absences. Senior citizens hold meetings at the school and participate in school activities.

West Jacksonville Elementary now has a stable faculty who choose to teach there; out-of-school suspensions are down.

"She is quite remarkable, a very classy lady in a tough educational situation," said Katherine Kasten, dean of UNF's College of Education and Human Services.

MARILYN REPSHER

In 1999, Jacksonville University honored Marilyn Repsher, professor of mathematics and chairwoman of the mathematics department, with two Presidential Teaching awards for her courses in calculus and college algebra. Then the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education named her U. S. Professor of the Year for Master's Universities and Colleges, the highest award for teaching that a university faculty member can receive. In March, she was selected as a Carnegie Scholar, one of 40 faculty nationwide who will work together to develop new conceptual methods of teaching.

Her innovative methods have spread to the local school system and have resulted in her department being singled out for its innovations by the American Association of Colleges and Uni- versities in the Handbook of the Undergraduate Curriculum (1996).

"She's a person who can just make math a joy for students, which it usually isn't," said Joan Carver, dean of JU's College of Arts and Sciences.

CAROLYN STONE

Carolyn Stone is both an innovator and a problem solver, according to Laurel Anderson, supervisor of guidance services for Duval County Public Schools. Anderson has watched the assistant professor in counselor education at the University of North Florida transform that department into a national model for school counselor education.

Stone created a school counselor master's program, "School Counselors: Supporters of Academic Rigor," SOAR for short. In addition to actively recruiting minority candidates, the program better prepares counselors to help students succeed academically. As a result, UNF was one of six universities out of 72 to receive a Dewitt Wallace-Reader's Digest grant to transform school counseling.

"Bringing this vision to reality meant making changes that many thought impossible: separating the school [academic] counselor from the mental health counselor program and revising the entire core curriculum," said Anderson.

NINA WATERS

Nina Waters, executive director of PACE Center for Girls of Jacksonville, led a team of staff and volunteers in raising $2. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Twelve Finalists for EVE Awards Women Bring Vision, Leadership into 2000
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.