Nutrition Summit Highlights America's Weight Problem Experts Say Diet Must Be Priority

The Florida Times Union, June 4, 2000 | Go to article overview

Nutrition Summit Highlights America's Weight Problem Experts Say Diet Must Be Priority


Prodding people to stop smoking or to buckle up their seatbelts almost looks easy compared to the newest public health campaign: trim America's oversized waistline.

Smoking focuses on breaking a single habit. Seatbelts requires learning one. But getting people into shape involves making many environmental changes, large and small, so people can upgrade their diets and exercise regularly.

Last week's National Nutrition Summit in Washington signaled the need to grapple with the complex and often subtle reasons why about 50 percent of adults are overweight, including 20 percent who are considered obese. The extra pounds increase a person's risk for chronic diseases.

"The summit coalesced people . . . to do something and to do something now," said John Peters, a nutritional biochemist at Procter & Gamble who has specialized in obesity research. Yet, he added, "there is no one fix."

Indeed, the summit organizers -- the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- will be combing through the dozens of suggestions that emerged from the two-day conference. U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher plans to convene a meeting this fall to develop a national action plan to address weight problems and obesity. Eileen Kennedy, a USDA undersecretary, said she expected to launch new nutritional campaigns later this year but was not specific about their scope.

"What remains to be seen is if a process emerges to take the [obesity] recommendations forward," said William Dietz, director of the division of nutrition and physical activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The government agencies are "eager and willing to do this. But there has got to be an atmosphere" that fosters a public and private partnership. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Nutrition Summit Highlights America's Weight Problem Experts Say Diet Must Be Priority
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.