Both Candidates Back Dreaded Standardized Tests

The Florida Times Union, June 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Both Candidates Back Dreaded Standardized Tests


RICHMOND, Va. -- Their platforms are designed to please, but in one respect George W. Bush and Al Gore are siding with an education reform that is driving some parents, kids, teachers and school administrators batty.

High-stakes standardized testing is seen by the presidential candidates as one antidote to mediocrity in the classroom.

On the trailing edge of the school year, pupils have been knee-deep in the state tests.

Hotly debated in education policy circles, and the subject of protests and even boycotts in some parts of the country, standardized tests are nevertheless supported by a political consensus that crosses party and state lines.

The idea is to develop meaningful standards for what public schoolchildren should know in core subjects. Students are given statewide tests on top of their normal schoolwork, and the results are used to judge how well both school and student are doing.

Increasingly, these test scores are determining whether students can advance a grade or graduate. About 30 states require or plan to require every high school student to pass a statewide test to get a diploma.

Pupils hunched over these exams are carrying a weight larger than their own prospects for advancement: Their marks can determine how much money a school or district gets from the state, whether local administrators retain autonomy and ultimately whether a school stays open.

Republican Bush and Democrat Gore propose to tie the scores to federal education dollars as well, increasing the consequences, although in different ways.

Bush is quick to talk about rising test scores in Texas. His education plan says: "Testing makes standards meaningful, promotes competition and empowers parents and teachers to seek change. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Both Candidates Back Dreaded Standardized Tests
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.