Blood-Loss Scare for Madonna Led to Caesarian Birth

By Singh, Anita | The Birmingham Post (England), August 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Blood-Loss Scare for Madonna Led to Caesarian Birth


Singh, Anita, The Birmingham Post (England)


Pop singer Madonna had an emergency operation to save the life of her then-unborn baby after suffering complications in her pregnancy, it emerged yesterday.

The star was rushed to the Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles suffering from abdominal pains and losing blood three weeks before baby Rocco was due.

Doctors discovered she had a detached placenta, cutting off the baby's oxygen supply. The condition can be life-threatening to both mother and unborn child.

Madonna then underwent an emergency caesarian section, with lover Guy Ritchie by her side, according to reports.

A hospital source said: 'Madonna lost a lot of blood. For any mother, just seeing that amount of blood is terrifying.'

Rocco Ritchie was born early on Friday morning, weighing 5lb 9oz.

Madonna had been due to give birth at the city's Good Samaritan Hospital, where her first child, Lourdes, was delivered four years ago.

But, when she began losing blood, she was taken to the nearest hospital, Cedars Sinai, where actress Catherine Zeta Jones gave birth to baby Dylan last week.

Madonna's spokeswoman, Liz Rosenberg, refused to confirm whether the singer was still in hospital but said: 'Madonna is overjoyed.

'She is safe, as is little Rocco. Guy and Lourdes are by her side.'

The star again chose renowned obstetrician Dr Paul Fleiss, father of infamous madam Heidi Fleiss, to deliver her second child.

Rocco was born hours after Madonna attacked British hospitals as 'old and Victorian' and said she planned to have the child in the more 'efficient' US.

The superstar, who is renting a London house, took her swipe at the NHS during an interview with a US radio station.

The Good Samaritan offers a one-day delivery package, inclusive of hospital and medical charges, of pounds 2,745.

A two-day Caesarean package - the method by which Lourdes was delivered - costs pounds 3,431. Every extra day at the hospital costs pounds 343.

Ritchie and Madonna began dating as the film-maker bathed in the success of his East End action movie Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels.

Although it was rumoured that Ritchie had admired Madonna from afar for many years, it was not until the pair met last year at a showbiz lunch hosted by rock star Sting's wife, Trudie Styler, that the pair met.

Ritchie grew up at the 17th Century Lowton Park, near Shrewsbury, a manor house belonging to his then-stepfather, Sir Michael Leighton, the 11th holder of a 300-year-old baronetcy.

By contrast, the father of Lourdes was Leon Carlos, a 29-year-old American fitness instructor who, it is said, Madonna first caught sight off by chance as he jogged past in Central Park, New York.

The pair split up seven months after the birth of their daughter.

Pop diva Madonna had an emergency operation to save the life of her then-unborn baby after suffering complications in her pregnancy, it emerged yesterday.

The star was rushed to the Cedars Sinai Hospital, Los Angeles, suffering from abdominal pains and losing blood three weeks before baby Rocco was due.

Doctors discovered she had a detached placenta, cutting off the baby's oxygen supply. The condition can be life-threatening to both mother and unborn child. …

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