Carol Vorderman Internet Column: Carol's Diary

By Vorderman, Carol | The Mirror (London, England), August 25, 2000 | Go to article overview

Carol Vorderman Internet Column: Carol's Diary


Vorderman, Carol, The Mirror (London, England)


NOW I'm not exactly a supporter of the overly expensive and up-its-own-bottom BBC Radio 3.

It's listened to by 500,000 people with private education, posh voices and a house in France, and paid for by 50 million people with a state education and a house in Wigan (or places like it).

In fact, if I ever become a governor of the BBC - a thought to horrify the chattering classes to their very core, and something I think I'll start to campaign for, purely for buggerment - the first thing I'll do is massively reduce its budget to a nice round number. Like nought.

The Chief Conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Slatkin, has done nothing to sway my opinion either. This week, this baton-waving broadcaster has said that women in the orchestra should cover up if they have flabby arms, and that those who are "broader in the beam" shouldn't wear trousers.

Please note that this has not been reported on the BBC Radio 3 news pages www.bbc.co.uk. So what do we know of chauvinistic Mr Slatkin?

Described by his BBC boss as having an "instinctive flair for communicating with audiences" which makes him "an ideal figure for an orchestra committed to the public service ethos". Mr Slatkin comments have not gone down well with the musical girlies.

Their general consensus is that he's a "musical dinosaur". Go get him girls. Mr Adonis Slatkin will be working on the Last Night of the Prom next month. Maybe, after his recent pronouncements, it should be renamed "Singing With Dinosaurs"?

SINCE the technology shares crash in March, yetties have been as hard to find as their hairy Tibetan namesakes.

Yes, yes, I mean "yetties", as in "a young person making his or her fortune in the internet-based economy". Well, that's how it's described by the New Penguin English Dictionary - www. penguin.co.uk

They've got some modern goodies in this new publication, including "mouse potato" - someone who spends a large part of their leisure time using a computer - and "cyberchondriac" - somebody who, having consulted a medical self-diagnosis site on the internet, goes to a doctor complaining of an ailment they have convinced themselves they're suffering from.

NOW all of this makes dictionaries a little bit more exciting (I did say little), but while I was digging around in a net-induced haze this morning, I stumbled across a bit of dictionary history which woke me up. …

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