Cooperation and Respect despite Political Differences: Adapting the United Nations to a Changing World

UN Chronicle, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

Cooperation and Respect despite Political Differences: Adapting the United Nations to a Changing World


An atmosphere of cooperation and mutual respect prevailed during the fifty fourth session of the General Assembly--the last before the new millennium--despite divergence of views on a wide variety of issues. Consensus on Security Council reform, implementation of the outcome of the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, and the causes of conflict and the promotion of a durable peace and sustainable development in Africa remained elusive. Chaired by its President, Theo-Ben Gurirab of Namibia, the Assembly adopted 250 resolutions, 19 of which were on strengthening the coordination of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

The Assembly held 10 days of general debate (20 September-2 October), during which speakers voiced their views on such crucial issues as globalization, poverty eradication, the international monetary system, conflict, disarmament, the United Nations financial situation, the debt burden, the effect of sanctions, and the HIV/AIDS pandemic (see UN Chronicle issue 4, 1999). The debate was punctuated by a special session on 27 and 28 September, reviewing the implementation of the results of the 1994 Global Conference on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (see issue 3,1999). Secretary-General Kofi Annan, at the opening of the debate, stressed that efforts to combat war and poverty would succeed only if the United Nations adapted to a world of new actors, new responsibilities and new possibilities for peace and progress. That theme--adapting the United Nations to a changing world--was reflected in many of the issues the Assembly dealt with, in particular humanitarian intervention.

Repeated references to "unauthorized" humanitarian intervention helped fuel the long-standing call for reform of the Security Council. During a two-day debate on reform, a number of speakers highlighted the Council's "paralysis" in times of crisis and charged it with "secretive, rigid and exclusionary working methods". Most delegations continued to insist on an expanded and more representative Security Council to enhance its credibility, legitimacy and effectiveness and to reflect fundamental global changes. Mr. Gurirab stressed that although all agreed on the need for substantial changes in the Council's composition and working procedures, there was still no consensus on its reform, nor on the important issues of humanitarian intervention and sanctions.

On Africa, the Assembly noted the Secretary-General's commitment to ensure, as an "urgent priority", sustained peace, stability and development in Africa. The Assembly President supported Mr. Annan's suggestion that the Assembly establish a working group to review the progress made in implementing the proposals in his report on the causes of conflict in Africa. The Assembly decided to convene a conference on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects in June/July 2001. Also, criticizing the regional imbalance in international assistance, speakers drew attention to the international community's lack of support for African problems. Mr. Gurirab further highlighted the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa, which threatened the very

existence of many African countries. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cooperation and Respect despite Political Differences: Adapting the United Nations to a Changing World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.