Short, Sharp and Simple Way to Website Success; for Let's Do Lunch Column

By Smart, Philippa | The Birmingham Post (England), September 4, 2000 | Go to article overview

Short, Sharp and Simple Way to Website Success; for Let's Do Lunch Column


Smart, Philippa, The Birmingham Post (England)


'The crucial part of devising a website is the promotion of the site.'

There has certainly been an awakening during the last couple of years to the appreciation of design in general - whether it be graphic, product, cultural or on-line.

With this greater understanding of the design concept, comes a requirement for graphic design services to be delivered into much larger projects requiring specific marketing expertise.

More than ever before design consultancies are becoming involved with their clients at a strategic advisory level.

They are working much more closely with them to think through the marketing plan, with the primary emphasis on how design can ultimately achieve the objectives that were set out at the start of the promotional campaign.

Progressive businesses, whether large or small, are increasingly recognising the fundamental importance of design as a profit earner rather than a cost.

The return on investment of a well designed, well thought out project can be extremely high when created by a reputable design consultancy.

In our current business climate, design consultancies should concentrate heavily on delivering tangible results for their clients, as, over the next few years, this will be key.

Without doubt, future requirements will increasingly be 'digital-led'. Whether this be digital short run print or digital marketing, such as promotional CD Roms, websites, and screensavers.

We have no option whatsoever but to take the right steps forward and integrate these new media services into our overall design package.

What clients look for and what they need can more often than not be poles apart. We see this as our role as a design consultancy - to help them conclude what the marketing programme should be and what elements will require graphic design services.

There are many elements that a client could select, or indeed a combination, and the trend towards the creation of a website continues to pave the way for the future.

The mistake many companies are making is that they do not always know why they want a website.

Is it simply to keep abreast of the Internet explosion and current trends or do they really believe it will add value to their image and at the same time, increase margins?

Many clients have no set objectives and in turn, their website lacks interest and traffic and isn't as successful as they originally anticipated. Mistakes are also made by website designers.

Some sites can be far too complicated and wordy and therefore, visitors will leave before it has even downloaded. …

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