Welfare Reform Halves Rolls, Recipient Families

By Wetzstein, Cheryl | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 3, 2000 | Go to article overview

Welfare Reform Halves Rolls, Recipient Families


Wetzstein, Cheryl, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The nation's welfare rolls have been cut in half in the four years since states began implementing new welfare-to-work programs.

The number of welfare recipients has fallen from 12.2 million in August 1996, when Congress enacted welfare reform, to 6.2 million in December 1999, or a 49 percent drop, said the Department of Health and Human Services.

The number of welfare families also dropped by almost half during the same time period, from 4.4 million to 2.3 million.

Welfare watchers expect the rolls to keep dropping, but they have a lively disagreement about how low the rolls can go.

As of December 1999, 2.3 percent of the U.S. population was on welfare, the statistics show, the lowest level since 1966.

Welfare reform, now moving into its fifth year, should see "consistent declines in rolls and more people entering the work force," said William Waldman, executive director of the American Public Human Services Administration, a trade group for welfare officials.

"One of the great unanswered questions," however, is whether the caseload drop will eventually level off, he said.

Many analysts think the declines will stop once the rolls are filled with people who are not ready to work, said Mr. Waldman, a former welfare official in New Jersey.

He also said no one knows what will happen to the rolls should the economy turn down or stagnate.

Heritage Foundation welfare analyst Robert Rector said that welfare rolls can drop much further than they have, based on what has happened in Wisconsin, where Gov. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Welfare Reform Halves Rolls, Recipient Families
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.