Collectivism Doesn't Work with Education

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 30, 2000 | Go to article overview

Collectivism Doesn't Work with Education


Recently, the Facility Advisory Committee for Education, a District 300 steering committee made up of teachers, parents and community members, unveiled the results of six months of information gathering. Their comprehensive study reveals the need for $101 million in capital improvements and expansion. This information provided the groundwork for an approximately $88 million tax referendum in November.

I applaud the members of FACE for all their work. Unfortunately, it is possible their efforts will be for naught; the last three District 300 referendums have been voted down.

There is something wrong with an education system that requires you to plead with your neighbors simply because you want to improve the quality of your child's education.

Can you imagine if the automotive industry were operated in the same way? Imagine that Ford Motor Co. was manufacturing and offering only Pintos. If it were run the same way we run public education, a core group of us would have to convince our neighbors to fork over tens of millions of dollars so Ford could modernize its product line. It would take even more money if we wanted Ford to start offering sedans, pickups and minivans.

To bring about this multimillion-dollar automotive upgrade, everybody would have to contribute, including those who are completely satisfied with the cars they currently are driving and those who don't even own cars.

That would be a rather crazy way to run the automotive industry. Obviously, it is far better to let each of us retain control of our transportation dollars so we can spend them as we see fit. Furthermore, we get the most for our money when multiple car manufacturers compete for our automotive dollars.

So, too, it is with education. It would be far better if we were permitted to keep our education dollars so that each of us could route those dollars to the organizations that best meet our children's needs. …

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