Reading Top Priority U-46 Lengthens the Day at Middle School to Add Emphasis to Key Subject

By Tabor, Terri | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 31, 2000 | Go to article overview

Reading Top Priority U-46 Lengthens the Day at Middle School to Add Emphasis to Key Subject


Tabor, Terri, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


When Larsen Middle School eighth-grader Rachel Jachowske saw reading on her class schedule, she thought it was a mistake.

She learned how to read in grade school and thought she took it as a yearlong subject for the last time in sixth grade.

"I was really surprised to see it on my schedule. I thought it was a mess-up," she said.

It wasn't a mistake.

In an effort to boost overall academic achievement at the seventh- and eighth-grade levels, U-46 has lengthened the middle school day adding reading as a core subject at all seven of its middle schools.

The move makes the state's second largest school district part of a growing trend to make reading a core subject in the elementary schools.

"That's an important move as we look at reading at the middle school level," said Sue Swaim, executive director of the National Middle School Association. "We are certainly hearing that this is an issue that middle schools are refocusing on."

"It is very sort of forward thinking on their part," said Xavier Botana, division administrator for middle-level education for the state board of education.

U-46 educators believe building on reading skills will have a domino effect on other subjects such as science, math and social studies - all which require literacy skills. As a result, district officials hope to see academic improvement and, ultimately, better scores on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test.

"It's to help students in a lot of ways - test scores being just one of them," Area Superintendent Jim Feuerborn said.

Although U-46 eighth-graders improved last year's scores in math and writing, this year's scores still fell below state averages.

Eighth-grade reading scores remained the same this year with 65 percent of students meeting or exceeding state standards. But that's 7 percent below the state average of 72 percent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Reading Top Priority U-46 Lengthens the Day at Middle School to Add Emphasis to Key Subject
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.