The Last Picture Show? Theater Chains Are Finding Themselves in a Truly Scary Movie as Rampant Overbuilding Has Led to Problems

Newsweek, September 18, 2000 | Go to article overview

The Last Picture Show? Theater Chains Are Finding Themselves in a Truly Scary Movie as Rampant Overbuilding Has Led to Problems


The films may not be getting any better, but the theaters sure are. When Misty Croughen and Dara Robertson of Ventura County, Calif., went to see "Nutty Professor II: The Klumps," they enjoyed stadium seating, gourmet snacks, handy cupholders, a choice of starting times at convenient 30-minute intervals and crystal-clear digital sound. "You pay more," says computer programmer Croughen, who handed over $7.75 per ticket at the Edwards Camarillo Palace 12 Cinemas. "But it's worth it."

The moviegoers' nirvana, however, has turned into a financial hell for the nation's big theater chains. Five years ago such exhibitors as AMC and Regal launched a building blitz as they set out to transform the pedestrian act of moviegoing into a plush theme-park-like experience. Sony's popular Metreon in San Francisco touts 15 theaters, one giant Imax screen, nine restaurants and even a Maurice Sendak "Where the Wild Things Are" store. The goal was to lure people to the movies more often and have them spend more per trip on fancier concessions. The proliferation of new theaters was also supposed to usher in a golden new era of moviegoing, with screens available for new hits, the classics and indie films. In 1995 there were 27,805 screens in the United States. By last year the number had jumped 34 percent to 37,185.

The construction boom, however, hasn't had a happy Hollywood ending. While the number of theaters exploded, ticket sales have increased at a far slower rate. Now the new theaters are fighting over the same customers and killing off the older shoebox-size theaters. In Houston the AMC Studio 30 sits less than four miles from the 24-screen Cinemark Tinseltown, and last week both were showing 21 of the same movies. "We put megaplexes too close to competing megaplexes and even our own theaters," admits Edwards Theatres' Steve Coffey. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Last Picture Show? Theater Chains Are Finding Themselves in a Truly Scary Movie as Rampant Overbuilding Has Led to Problems
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.