Hawke Eyes Online Access to Bank Files

By Canning, Eileen | American Banker, September 18, 2000 | Go to article overview

Hawke Eyes Online Access to Bank Files


Canning, Eileen, American Banker


Hawke Eyes Online Access to Bank Files

As part of an initiative called "Examination in the 21st Century," the Comptroller's Office is developing an online system that would let regulators remotely view bank documents and analyze data to reduce time spent in the institutions. Examiners could then devote their visits more to discussions with management.

"No longer will it be necessary for bank employees to compile vast stacks of paper for examiner scrutiny," Mr. Hawke said in remarks prepared for delivery Sunday. "Our examiners will be able to sit at the computer terminals at their duty stations and do the analytical work that needs to be done before meeting with bank management."

Though technical and legal issues will arise, Mr. Hawke said, he urged bankers to help examiners develop a technology that could benefit both.

"Online, real-time access to bank information holds the potential to further transform the supervisory process," he said, " -- to reduce burdens on you and to ensure that the time of our examiners is spent productively and well."

Mr. Hawke did not establish a time frame for this project.

The comptroller also said the agency is in the midst of updating its National BankNet Web site to include early warning standards for monitoring banks' health, methods for calculating risk-based capital, internal agency reports, legislative and regulatory analysis, and economic and risk updates.

National BankNet is a secure Web site -- available only to national banks -- that is designed to improve communication between the agency and bankers. …

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Hawke Eyes Online Access to Bank Files
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