Marketing Mavens Share War Stories on Web Branding

By Power, Carol | American Banker, September 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

Marketing Mavens Share War Stories on Web Branding


Power, Carol, American Banker


Branding and the Internet was a big topic with a host of speakers at the American Bankers Association marketing conference in Orlando last week.

The confusion and cynicism that can possess consumers doing business online can seriously hamper a business that is not backed by a solid brand, one speaker warned.

"People use the Internet because it gives them a sense of power," said Vada Hill, chief marketing officer of e-business at Fannie Mae. "But there are a lot of people who are negative -- not only about mortgages but financial services in general."

A trusted name and/or product can overcome that, Mr. Hill said. "The process associated with a big, known brand is very important."

This can be a particularly tricky issue for companies involved in mergers. Chase Manhattan Corp. and J.P. Morgan & Co. could have a tough time blending their Web offerings -- Morgan's online private banking service jpmorgan.com, launched in the spring, and Chase Online Banking, the consumer product rolled out last year.

One thing the companies have agreed on for the offline side is that Morgan will be the brand for the corporate bank, Chase for the consumer businesses.

Bank One Corp. has spent millions to market its Wingspanbank.com Internet-only bank, with limited success. Some observers say the Chicago company would be better off leveraging its established image instead of trying to create a new one for the Web offshoot.

Terri Dial, group executive vice president at Wells Fargo & Co., discussed branding in a service context.

"Customers want to do business with companies that have a strong brand, because a brand promises outstanding service," she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Marketing Mavens Share War Stories on Web Branding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.