Measuring the Mood of Seventh-Grade Students with the Maacl-R6

By Lubin, Bernard; Denman, Nancy et al. | Adolescence, Fall 1998 | Go to article overview

Measuring the Mood of Seventh-Grade Students with the Maacl-R6


Lubin, Bernard, Denman, Nancy, Whitlock, Rodney Van, Adolescence


ABSTRACT

Recently, the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List--Revised was modified to include only those items designated as at or below the sixth-grade reading level (MAACL-R6). The present study investigated the reliability and validity of the state and trait forms of the MAACL-R6 in a sample of seventh-grade public school students. High internal consistency and adequate validity were found for both forms. Test-retest reliability was higher for trait than for state. It was concluded that the MAACL-R6 is appropriate for use in research with seventh-grade students.

During the past decade, there has been growing concern over the reading level of patient educational materials, research consent forms, and self-report instruments used to collect data. Considering that as much as 10% of the U.S. population is illiterate (Jubelirer, Linton, & Magnetti, 1994), this concern is warranted. Some educational materials routinely used to provide childhood immunization information have been found to exceed the reading ability of most parents (Melman, Kaplan, Caloustian, Weinberger, Smith, & Anbar, 1994). In many cases, there is a serious mismatch between the reading level of clinic users and the instructional materials and consent forms that are provided to them (Larson & Schumacher, 1992; Davis, Crouch, Wills, Miller, & Abdehou, 1990; LoVerde, Prochazka, & Byyny, 1989). In the case of psychological assessment, self-report inventories that cannot be read or comprehended are, of course, useless.

In addition to lowering the reading level of assessment instruments (Barad & Hughes, 1984; Cella, 1984; Franco, 1986; Godfrey & Knight, 1986; Harrington & Follett, 1984; McGiboney & Carter, 1985), there has been concurrent interest in reducing their overall length. Thus, short forms of instruments in the following areas have been developed: intelligence (Applegate & Kaufman, 1989; Pieters & Sieberhagen, 1986; Silverstein, 1990; Watkins, Edinger, & Shipley, 1989), personality (Kincannon, 1968; McGiboney & Carter, 1985; Nelson, Turner, & McCreary, 1991; Vondell & Cyr, 1990; Francis & Pearson, 1988; Grayson, 1986), depression (Alden, Austin, & Sturgeon, 1989; Friedrich, Reams, & Jacobs, 1988; Meneese & Yutrzenka, 1990; Westaway & Wolmarans, 1992), alcoholism (Rather, 1990; Willenbring, Christensen, Rasmussen, & Spring, 1987), clinical neuropsychology (Horton, Anilane, Puente, & Berg, 1988; Sherrill, 1987; Thompson & Heaton, 1989), and health status and attitudes (Katz, Larson, Phillips, & Fossel, 1992; Yarnold, Bryant, & Grimm, 1987).

Considering the importance of emotion to research on personality and health, the development of brief mood measures that have appropriate reading levels should have high priority. Comprehension is especially important for instruments that have an adjective checklist format, where nonresponses due to inability to understand an item might be construed as inapplicability of that item.

It has been determined that the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List-Revised (MAACL-R; Zuckerman & Lubin, 1985) has an eighth-grade reading level (Lubin, Collins, Seever, & Whitlock, 1991). In order to make the MAACL-R suitable for use with children, young adolescents, and adults with low reading levels, a scoring key was recently developed that retained only those adjectives designated as at or below the sixth-grade reading level by Dale and O'Rourke's (1981) comprehension procedure. This key has been validated using the rescored MAACL-R results of referred and nonreferred adults (Lubin, Whitlock, & Rea, 1995). The purpose of the present study was to extend previous findings (Lubin, Whitlock, & Rea, 1995) by determining the psychometric characteristics of the state and trait forms of the 62-item MAACL-R6 when administered to seventh-grade students.

METHOD

Subjects

Subjects were drawn from two semirural Missouri public school systems. …

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