Retirees Not Invited to State's Tax Rebate Party Checks Based on Taxable Income Only, Officials Say

By Patterson, John | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Retirees Not Invited to State's Tax Rebate Party Checks Based on Taxable Income Only, Officials Say


Patterson, John, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


SPRINGFIELD - Joyce Wagstaff peeked into her mailbox to find the usual assortment of campaign literature, junk mail and bills.

One thing the 64-year-old Buffalo Grove woman didn't find was an income tax rebate check from the state. And neither will anyone else living off retirement or disability income.

"It's such a joke," said Wagstaff, who has lived in her home and paid property taxes for 42 years, but whose only income comes from Social Security. She called the rebate plan a "selfish" idea put forth by "politicians who want to look good in the eyes of some of their constituents."

Last week, the state began mailing the first batch of what will be more than 2 million rebate checks. Barring a postal meltdown, suburban homeowners should have begun receiving those checks, with the rest of the state to follow over the next few weeks. In all, $280 million is being sent back to taxpayers. The average rebate will be $125; the maximum is $300.

The rebates are part of $350 million in tax cuts approved by the legislature during the spring session. The money comes from tobacco companies. Illinois was one of 46 states that filed a class-action lawsuit against the companies in 1996 seeking to recoup money spent on health care for people with smoking-related illnesses. The companies settled out of court, and over the next 25 years Illinois is scheduled to receive $9.1 billion.

But as the rebate checks are being mailed, people in situations similar to Wagstaff's are learning they are not included. And many are not happy.

Gov. George Ryan's office has received one complaint, spokesman Nick Palazzolo said. "It came from a senior who felt he was being left out of the mix," Palazzolo said.

Nearly two dozen calls had been logged by the Illinois Department of Revenue, "nearly all from people who will not get checks," spokesman Mike Klemens said.

State Sen. Wendell Jones, a Palatine Republican, has received a combined 10 letters and phone calls, in addition to people coming to his office.

"Whenever you do a tax cut, you have to leave somebody behind," Jones said. "I apologize when they call me. A guy living in his own home, paying $3,000 to $4,000 in real estate taxes, we ought to be able to get that guy some kind of rebate."

The reason people in this situation don't receive a rebate is rather simple. They didn't pay state income taxes to begin with.

"Seniors do get the ultimate tax break in that their pension income is not taxable," said Gregg Durham, spokesman for House Republican Leader Lee Daniels of Elmhurst.

To simplify the rebate process, the rebate amount is taken straight from state income tax forms. The rebate is equal to the 5 percent credit for property taxes that homeowners can claim on their state income taxes. The state looks at that line, and writes a check for that amount up to $300.

Because most retirement and disability income is not taxed in Illinois, these people don't file income tax forms and there's no amount to rebate.

"I would hope you would not have seniors complaining about not getting a tax rebate for a tax they never paid," said state Sen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Retirees Not Invited to State's Tax Rebate Party Checks Based on Taxable Income Only, Officials Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.