Beyond the Household: Women's Place in the Early South, 1700-1835

By Soderlund, Jean R. | The Journal of Southern History, August 2000 | Go to article overview

Beyond the Household: Women's Place in the Early South, 1700-1835


Soderlund, Jean R., The Journal of Southern History


Beyond the Household: Women's Place in the Early South, 1700-1835. By Cynthia A. Kierner. (Ithaca, N.Y., and London: Cornell University Press, c. 1998. Pp. xiv, 295. Paper, $18.95, ISBN 0-8014-8462-6; cloth, $55.00, ISBN 0-8014-3453-X.)

Cynthia A. Kierner accomplishes a number of goals in this study of southern, white, mostly upper-class, women and their status and roles from 1700 to 1835. Her work connects the seventeenth century--for which historians such as Lois Green Carr, Lorena Walsh, Kathleen Brown, and Mary Beth Norton have provided pathbreaking insights into southern women's experiences--to the antebellum period, for which Anne Firor Scott, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Catherine Clinton, and Jean Friedman have offered influential analyses. While Kierner grounds her work comprehensively in southern historiography, her primary frame of reference is the historical literature on northern white middle- and upper-class women of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Her main purpose is to determine the extent to which southern women's "place" was different from their northern counterparts', how that changed over time, and why. Her chief primary sources are the private papers of elite families of Virginia and the Carolinas, legislative petitions, newspapers, magazines, and other prescriptive literature published in the region.

Beyond the Household offers many important insights. Kierner's nuanced argument suggests that southern elite women involved themselves in the public sphere throughout the colonial and early national periods despite powerful ideologies that would confine them to domestic interests. She contests the distinction between public and private, as did early southern women themselves, contending that the private could be political. For example, colonial elite women provided essential resources for political networks by entertaining in their homes, collaborating on balls, and similar displays of gentility. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beyond the Household: Women's Place in the Early South, 1700-1835
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.