Saudi Arabia; A Kkingdom of Rich Cultural Heritage

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), September 23, 2000 | Go to article overview

Saudi Arabia; A Kkingdom of Rich Cultural Heritage


Saudi Arabia is a kingdom of culture, reflecting the achievements of Arabian peninsular civilizations of the past several thousand years.

Madain Saleh, which houses the tombs of the Nabataens, is one of the most important archaeological sites of the world and other interesting sites are scattered throughout the country. Even the Empty Quarter, one of the biggest sand deserts on Earth, contains locations of great interest to archaeologists.

Islam's important historical sites are to be found at the holy places of Makkah and Medinah near the west coast of Saudi Arabia . The history of the Muslims can be viewed at the Badr Battlefield and other places of armed struggle, at the old castles and forts and across the various pilgrimage routes.

Our religion has had a profound and enduring influence on the Arabic language, the arts and all aspects of our cultural development.

The founder of the modern Saudi state, the late King Abdulaziz (1880-1953), was determined to protect and maintain Islamic and Arab values. This has also been a key objective of successive kings during our nation building program of the past half century.

Modernity and tradition in the new Saudi Arabia walk hand in hand. Our architectural legacy, for example, provides a valuable record of previous civilizations and , happily, most new building projects in the Kingdom adapt ideas from the fine arts of Islam. Today, amid the bustle of 20th century life, contemporary writers look to the past for inspiration. Popular musicians incorporate ancient rhythms into their modern music and painters capture traditional scenes. Arabic calligraphy, dating back to the first century of Islam, is revered in Saudi Arabia and is characterized as the quintessential Islamic art form.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia willingly accepts the responsibility to communicate the values of its heritage not only in Saudi Arabia but throughout the Islamic and Arab worlds and internationally.

Universities and other educational institutions in the Kingdom have played a great part in the advancement of the Islamic and Arab civilization. A government department, the General Presidency of Youth Welfare, was set up to encourage cultural activities and has so far established 153 centers throughout the country.

The Saudi Arabian Society for Culture and Arts encourages the creativity of talented young people and represents the Kingdom at all Arab and international festivals. Literary Clubs in many of our cities and towns provide an important forum for intellectuals and act as cultural bridges between Saudis who have common interests.

The government has also supported the publishing sector, established public libraries throughout the country and opened twelve museums. The arts and crafts are supported at all levels. Rewards for excellence include the prestigious King Faisal International Prize. The National Festival for Heritage and Culture, held annually at Jenadriyah, is one of the most important such events in the Arab and International calendar.

Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, King Fahd Ibn Abdulaziz, the present

monarch and a son of the founder, in November 1998 donated $10 million to the Arab Cultural Development Fund and has allocated funds toward creativity in the Gulf Cooperative Council (GCC) states. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Saudi Arabia; A Kkingdom of Rich Cultural Heritage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.