News Scope; Korea-Japan Education Ministers Talks Fire

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), March 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

News Scope; Korea-Japan Education Ministers Talks Fire


Korean and Japanese education ministers held talks Monday in Seoul, the first since the former was liberated from the latter's colonial rule in 1945, but received a flurry of criticism from the public on both sides.

The highest concern of the Korean people was that the two ministers would discuss history textbooks of Japanese schools which contain a number of distortions on Korean history and bilateral relations, including colonial rule.

The core but thorny issue was excluded from the formal agenda although it is important for both countries to have constructive relations in the new millennium, a history expert said.

It is reported that the issue was dropped from the agenda at the request of Japanese Education Minister Hirofumi Nakasone.

This was contrary to the repeated demand of Korea to correct distorted history textbooks involving Korea. Japan has been lukewarm on the issue.

Timed with the education ministers' talks, the Korea Education Research Institute (KERI) reported in a paper that the textbooks used by Japanese middle and high schools still distort history related to Korea.

This determination results from a review of seven Japanese history books and another seven world history books currently used by Japanese middle and high schools.

For example, Japanese textbooks deny Korean ancient history and have deleted references to the forced sex slavery of Korean women to Japanese soldiers during World War II.

One more example KERI cited is the name ``Choson Kingdom'' (1392-1910) which is described as ``Choson of Yi'' or ``Yi Dynasty,'' phrases which were coined to rationalize Japanese colonial rule.

Dr. Lee Chan-hee of KERI said, ``Any education ministers' talks are meaningless if the textbook issue is not tackled. Furthermore, this was the first education ministers' talks in more than half a century.''

Korean Minister Moon Yong-lin was reported to have been rejected over the proposal of the adoption of the Korean language in the college entrance exams in Japan as a second foreign language, the same as Japanese has been adopted in Korea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

News Scope; Korea-Japan Education Ministers Talks Fire
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.