Thoughts of the Times; 'A Logical Reasoning' in Nature

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), April 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

Thoughts of the Times; 'A Logical Reasoning' in Nature


One bright March afternoon, I spent my time walking through a park. It was an occasion to derive inspiration from contemplating on nature. When I took a brief survey of the garden in the park, I was touched by the pleasant spring breeze which whispered low among the hibernating plants.

The sap of some of the garden trees are beginning to rise. Every ramification of the trees was tinged with blue. It was no less a plant than an azalea, an apricot, a forsythia, a magnolia, a pussy willow and all sorts of things which have put forth many flowers in bud; and the buds were beginning to bloom. The park calmly reposed under a soft, warm spring sun.

In that atmosphere, I was brimming with hope, and pleasant reveries sauntered through my mind in hopes that I will see various kinds of dainty flowers before long. When all is said and done, spring is like the embrace of a mother's arms.

Every year in springtime, when the days are long, my thoughts are always occupied with the expectation of seeing a lovely flower, which seems to be vying for splendor with one another. The first green of spring and new-blown flower always induces me to make greater efforts; and raises my spirits which is all that I can desire as a vital power in life. I attribute this to the plants' lively motion by a happy dispensation of nature.

In accordance with what is reasonable, the provision of nature reposes on the truth of nature. When we contemplate the present political situation, we notice that many politicians are the chief movers in the infringement of the rules, which is in sharp contrast to the truth exemplified by nature. Nature always tells the truth, and is closely related to our daily life. This is because human beings are part of nature and have a direct relationship with it.

It is quite true -- as I have heard -- that the purpose of an inductive reasoning is to infer general laws from particular occurrences. …

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