Burnt Mounds in the East Midlands

By Beamish, Matt; Ripper, Susan | Antiquity, March 2000 | Go to article overview

Burnt Mounds in the East Midlands


Beamish, Matt, Ripper, Susan, Antiquity


Within the last decade the emphasis of burnt mound research has been refocused on the prehistoric landscapes in which they are set in an attempt to evade just the perennial enigma of `function'. In the East Midlands, gravel quarrying in the major river valleys has provided an opportunity to examine large areas that have hitherto been masked by alluvium and the resulting wealth of archaeological information has included five burnt mound sites.

The first site was located on a palaeochannel of the river Soar in Birstall, Leicestershire, and contained the usual attributes of a burnt mound; a shallow crescent-shaped mound of fire-cracked stone and charcoal, two hearths and a trough. The trough was circular, lined with tangentially split oak planks and the sides were supported by woven wattle-work in the form of a basket (FIGURE 1). Immediately adjacent to the mound two parallel rows of oak posts extended across the palaeochannel -- perhaps the remains of a bridge or jetty. Animal bones were recovered from the palaeochannel silts including a decapitated horse skull and the remains of butchered cattle and aurochs. Elsewhere from the same channel deposits human bones were also recovered, representing the remains of at least two adult males. One skull, dated to cal BC 1040-810 (OxA-6831), had a series of sharp cut marks on the posterior of the atlas vertebrae. The cuts had not healed, indicating that they were inflicted at the time of or following death and suggest some form of either de-fleshing or decapitation.

[FIGURE 1 ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The second burnt mound was located on a palaeochannel of the river Trent at Castle Donington, Leicestershire, and included an oval mound, two hearths, sundry pits and an unlined trough. Cattle teeth were found in the trough and a few fragments of domestic animal bone were again found in the adjacent palaeochannel, with one cattle femur showing scrape marks associated with skinning bone. A hundred metres downstream a second burnt mound was also located and, within a 400-m radius, further excavations also produced Bronze Age flint scatters, pits, a post-built roundhouse and a small ring ditch.

The fourth burnt mound at Willington, Derbyshire, on the edge of a silted palaeochannel, had clearly been re-used. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Burnt Mounds in the East Midlands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.