Book Reviews

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), April 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


Sketches About Portugal

Many Koreans know little about Portugal, a historically rich European nation, and the interconnection between the two nations.

A 111-page Portugal guide book in Korean titled, ``Portugal -- Nation, History, Culture,'' and subtitled, ``The Portuguese Who Took Part in the Japanese Invasion of Korea (1592-8),'' provides a wide range of information about Portugal.

The Cultural Center affiliated with the Portuguese Embassy in Seoul has published 1,000 copies of the first edition.

The book is composed of the history of Portugal, a chronological comparison of the two countries in the 16th and 17th centuries and a culture chapter.

The cultural sector includes information on the language, literature, architecture, sculpture, fine arts, music, films and museums of the European nation.

The significance of Portugal can readily be seen as over 180 million people speak Portuguese as of 1995 and this number is expected to rise to 220 million by 2010, according to the Portuguese Cultural Center.

Past & Present of President Kim Dae-jung

President Kim Dae-jung has won fame around the globe since ascending to the presidency of South Korea in 1997 at the age of 72 and taking bold reform steps in virtually every sector of society.

A look at the creative genius who found well-deserved fame is contained in a new 112-page photo-illustrated biography titled, ``Kim Dae-jung,'' authored by U.S. biographer Norm Goldstein and published by Chelsea House Publishers in Philadelphia this year.

The book has been read by U.S. president Bill Clinton who commented, ``(Kim's) remarkable life history reminds us that, from Seoul to its sister city San Francisco, people everywhere share the same aspirations for freedom, for peace, for the opportunity of prosperity. …

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