Editor's Note

By Mongeau, Paul | Communication Studies, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Mongeau, Paul, Communication Studies


"He was a burning and a shining light; and ye were willing for a season to rejoice in his light."

John 5:35

This issue continues the theme of "Looking Forward/Looking Back" for Volume 50 of Communication Studies. This issue honors Gerald R. Miller (i.e., GRM), long associated with the Department of Communication at Michigan State University. As with the other scholars honored in this volume of the journal, GRM was renowned for his teaching, scholarship, service to the discipline, and mentoring.

When I began to formulate the idea of honoring four of the most influential scholars in the central region over the past 50 years, GRM was the first name to come to my mind. I am fortunate to have several mentors in my academic career, GRM among them. I would like to think that I have taken the best that each of these mentors has to offer into my own academic "persona."

In this issue, we have tried to communicate GRM's qualities as a scholar and as a person. As with the other issues in this volume, this issue combines peer-reviewed manuscripts with invited and reprinted pieces. Two of the three peer-reviewed pieces appearing in this issue (i.e., by Schrader and by Hale & Laliker) were originally submitted to the special issue on seeking and resisting compliance edited by Steve Wilson. I want to thank Steve again for his help in producing that issue and continuing to work with these manuscripts. These articles (with a response to the Hale & Laliker piece penned by Daniel O'Keefe) help to further an area of study initiated, in part by GRM. The final peer-reviewed piece in this issue is by Sandi Smith and a group of current and former Michigan State graduate students. So GRM's influence can be seen indirectly through all these articles. …

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