A Tribute to Gerald R. Miller

By Kalbfleisch, Pamela J. | Communication Studies, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

A Tribute to Gerald R. Miller


Kalbfleisch, Pamela J., Communication Studies


It came as a sadness but not a surprise that two weeks ago we lost Dr. Gerald R. Miller. Professor Miller, who was also lovingly known as G. R. or Gerry to his friends and family died May 20, 1993 after a long battle with cancer.

Professor Miller was a visible member of our network. I am sure that we all miss his hearty laughter at this conference. It is fitting that our young scholar's award bears Gerald R. Miller's name because G. R. very much believed that it is the young scholars who are the future of our combined areas of interest.

Professor Miller was both a Fellow of the International Communication Association and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. He was a University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University and was also a recipient of that university's distinguished faculty award for excellence in teaching and research.

Professor Miller was one of the first and foremost scholars that can be attributed with bringing the study of Interpersonal Communication to the field of Communication. At a time when people were looking at Interpersonal Communication as face to face communication between two people, Miller advocated looking beyond the mere number of participants and looking instead at the unique information that the interactants shared with one another, and their usage of this information in communicating with one another. In this way he distinguished interpersonal relationships from broader more sociologically based relationships.

Professor Miller contributed broadly across many areas of interpersonal concern. Perhaps two of the areas where he had the most impact are in the study of deceptive communication and in the study of compliance-gaining and influence. He received numerous awards for his study in these areas and his deception research was supported in part by grants from the National Science Foundation.

However, if you asked Professor Miller what he felt his greatest contribution was, he would tell you it was his students. Miller felt that producing a core of well trained scholars would do more to advance our understanding of interpersonal relationships than he alone could do in a lifetime.

I am honored to have been one of Professor Miller's students. Although, I am but one of many. While Professor Miller influenced each of our lives, his influence continues through our students, and in the case of my older academic siblings, their student's students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Tribute to Gerald R. Miller
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.