Threat Seen in Russia's Biological Agents

By McKenzie, Lesley | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Threat Seen in Russia's Biological Agents


McKenzie, Lesley, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Russia's biological weapons sites, which pose a far greater threat than do its nuclear weapons, may have been dismantled and hidden for future use, according to a leading specialist on the weapons plants.

"The capability of the old Russian Ministry of Defense sites remains uninvestigated and largely unknown," said Christopher Davis, a member of the first Western team to visit biological warfare facilities of the former Soviet Union.

"The suspicion is that, at the very least, the basic know-how, expertise, equipment and stock of seed cultures have been retained somewhere within the Ministry of Defense system," he said Monday at Jane's Conference on Weapons of Mass Destruction in Rosslyn.

Mr. Davis traced the Soviet history of biological warfare research and development, and noted areas of concern.

"Biological agents, if of the transmissible variety, are capable of causing casualties far in excess of those caused by nuclear weapons," he said.

These weapons are also available at a lower cost than nuclear weapons.

The special characteristics of biological weapons include their ability to attack all "living targets," which range from human beings to plants and livestock, possibly rendering a nation unable to feed itself.

Some biological weapons also have the ability to first exhibit their effects on an area hours or possibly days after their release, making it difficult to ascertain the identity of the aggressor.

The United States chose to disarm its biological warfare program in 1969, but the Soviet Union continued its warfare development through the establishment of an agency named Biopreparat in 1973-1974.

Biopreparat developed biological weapons behind a civilian facade of pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. This tactic served as an alternative to chemical and nuclear weapons controlled under arms treaties and weapons conventions.

For many years, only a small number of people across the Atlantic were aware of the problem, and many chose not to listen to their warnings, Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Threat Seen in Russia's Biological Agents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.