Ruthless Joe Lieberman

By Beichman, Arnold | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 12, 2000 | Go to article overview

Ruthless Joe Lieberman


Beichman, Arnold, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


"Say it ain't so, Joe." I'm afraid it is so. Sen. Joe Lieberman, ah frumer yid or, in English, a religious Jew announced on Sept. 26: "I'd be open to sitting and talking to Minister [Louis] Farrakhan . . . I have respect for him . . ." In February 1994, Vice President Gore said: "We should not tolerate any anti-Semitic statements by people like Louis Farrakhan." Mr. Lieberman would have agreed with Gore six years ago but then, of course, he wasn't running for vice president.

They called the baseball great Joe Jackson "Shoeless Joe Jackson." Let's call the senator from Connecticut "Ruthless Joe Lieberman." Would this Joe do anything to win the presidential election? You bet he would.

I wrote nothing when he sold out his position against affirmative action to placate Rep. Maxine Waters, or when he forgot his crusade against Hollywood depravity in the interests of campaign fund-raising. I wanted to see how flexible a conscience he had. Now I know. With his sellout to Minister Farrakhan, I have my answer. What Al Gore wouldn't dare do as a Southern Baptist, Ruthless Joe offers, as a devout Jew, to do gladly. Get it? Boy, they're smart.

Who is this man whom Ruthless Joe respects? I have followed Minister Farrakhan's career for some time. In particular, I recall a press conference on Feb. 3, 1994, at the Vista Hotel in Washington, which I attended. The oratory that afternoon would have suited a Nuremberg rally. I listened to a man who, speaking in the name of Allah, cited as theological justification for his hostility to Jews the Talmud, as having pronounced the curse of Ham on the black race. He accused Jews of being slave traders in the South. Mr. Farrakhan said he wanted to save the world from the "Jewish menace."

What I heard from the lips of Minister Farrakhan were not only accusations against Jews as enemies of blacks but also accusations against the Roman Catholic Church, because the Catholic Church, he said, had never spoken up against lynching and slavery. He demanded black disaffiliation from Catholic and Protestant denominations, from Christianity itself. He intends that American blacks join the Nation of Islam and accept the rule of the mosque. Minister Farrakhan's message is that liberation for blacks will come from Mohammed not Christ, from Mecca not Rome, from Islam not Christianity. …

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