... as Media Trumpets the Triumph of Sexy Singles

By Feder, Don | Insight on the News, September 25, 2000 | Go to article overview

... as Media Trumpets the Triumph of Sexy Singles


Feder, Don, Insight on the News


Time, which must give up the pretense of being a newsmagazine, had a recent cover story ("Who Needs a Husband?") celebrating single women. The feminists at Time are gratified to see that a trend they and their media sisters have nurtured for decades is bearing fruit pleasing to their palates.

The story is illustrated with a picture of those 30-something babes from the HBO cable TV series Sex and the City -- as if this show is any more representative of single women than HBO's The Sopranos is an accurate portrait of Italian-Americans.

To give it a journalistic air, the article is seeded with statistics. In 1997, 65 percent of women ages 25 to 55 were married, compared to 83 percent in 1963. Today, two out of five business travelers are women. Last year, unmarried women accounted for 20 percent of home sales, nearly double the figure of 15 years ago.

Single women feel no drive to marry, Time tells us. In one survey, only 34 percent said that if Mr. Perfect didn't come along they'd settle for Mr. Human. This reminds me of a parable my grandmother used to tell of a woman who wandered the world looking for the ideal man. When at last she found him, he was searching for the ideal woman.

"Single by choice -- it's an empowering statement for many women," the magazine exalted. Single women are sassy, spunky, livin' life and lovin' it. They have high-powered careers, exotic vacations, financial security and a live-in lover or a fling here and there. Who could ask for anything more? The ladies Time presents to illustrate its point are all career women (no tollbooth attendants, sales clerks or overworked waitresses here). One is the director of a nonprofit organization in Washington, with "a gorgeous Capitol Hill town house, trips all over the world and a silver blue BMW roadster."

To be sure, and the typical single man looks like he just stepped out of the pages of GQ summers on Martha's Vineyard and races sports cars when he isn't dating supermodels.

For the last 30 years, feminists in academia have instructed young women in the virtues of independence and in the folly of being subjugated to men. Feminists in prime-time television filled their heads with visions of the solo good life. …

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