The End of an Era

By Abdur-Rahman, Sufiya | Negro History Bulletin, July-December 1998 | Go to article overview

The End of an Era


Abdur-Rahman, Sufiya, Negro History Bulletin


Olive Taylor's place in Howard University history seems to have been set naturally. After all, four generations of her family have attended the University. But after more than three decades of teaching African American and U.S. History at the University, Taylor has announced her retirement.

"I'm gonna sleep for a long time" Taylor said. "I'm tired!"

Taylor, who has had thousands of students clamor for seats in her Frederick Douglass Hall classes, taught material she learned from legendary Howard professors, such as John Hope Franklin, Rayford Logan and Lorraine Williams. In the 37 years she has taught at Howard, Taylor, 64, has become one of the institution's legends.

When she began teaching at the University in the 1960s, Howard students were demanding civil rights and protesting national phenomenon, like the Vietnam War.

As students struggled for their voices to be heard, Taylor found it difficult to work and participate in student uprisings, But she managed and was able to balance the two. "Howard brought about social change. I was a part of that, Taylor said. "Students can't do today what we did in the 1960s."

Taylor, a native Washingtonian, received her bachelor's degree in history from the University in 1955 and later moved to New York. She worked at Abraham & Strauss, a clothing store, before realizing that her career in fashion did not reflect the education she received at Howard.

So Taylor returned to Howard, earning a master's degree in U.S. History while working in a teaching fellowship. By 1968, Taylor was a full-time instructor. And in 1973, she received her doctorate in history from the University.

Taylor received her high school education from Paul Laurence Dunbar [High School] where it was assumed all graduates would enroll in Howard University. "Under segregation, I attended the black academic high school," she said. "It wasn't much of a choice. After all this is the `Capstone.'"

Unlike many new professors in her era who strove for positions at white universities, Taylor was adamant about teaching at Howard. "I did not want to go anyplace else," she said. "This was the premier black institution when I was chosen."

It didn't take a long for Taylor to realize that her talent to teach could not be contained. "When I spoke, people listened to me." Taylor said. "My life is based upon the realization that God has given me certain gifts. I have always understood that such gifts had to be used. I have dedicated my life to bringing those gifts into the classroom" she said.

Taylor's dedication to her students paid off in 1994, when the Howard University Student Association honored her with the "Teacher of the Year Award. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The End of an Era
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.