Current Faculty & Publications

Negro History Bulletin, July-December 1998 | Go to article overview

Current Faculty & Publications


Dr. Aziz A. Batran

Dr. Aziz A. Batran is associate professor. He received his doctorate from the University of Birmingham, Great Britain, in 1972. His areas of specialization are North and West Africa and the history of Islam in Africa. Dr. Batran is editor of Al-Watam Al-Jadid and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Sudanese Information and Cultural Center (Cairo). Dr. Batran has a forthcoming publication: Controversy and Consensus: Tobacco Smoking in Muslim West and North Africa (The Maghrib Review Press, London).

Dr. Allison Blakely

Dr. Allison Blakely received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1971. His areas are European history (particularly Russian history) and the black diaspora. Dr. Blakely joined the Howard history department in 1971. He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has written: Russia and the Negro: Blacks in Russian History and Thought (Howard University Press, 1986) and Blacks in the Dutch World: Racial Imagery and Modernization (Indiana University Press, 1993). Among his articles are "European Dimensions of the African Diaspora," in M.W. Coy, Jr. and L. Plotinov, eds., "Africa in World History: Old, New, Then and Now," University of Pittsburgh Ethnology, Monographs No. 16, 1995.

Dr. Selwyn Carrington

Dr. Selwyn Carrington is associate professor. He received his Ph.D. from the University of London in 1975. His fields are the British Empire and Colonial economic history. Dr. Carrington joined the Howard history department in the mid-1990s. Before that he had been at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad. In September of 1996 he was one of the organizers of the conference "Capitalism and Slavery Fifty Years Later: Eric Williams and the Post Colonial Caribbean." Dr. Carrington is the author of The British West Indies During the American Revolution (Foris Publications, Leiden, 1988).

Dr. Elizabeth Clark-Lewis

Dr. Elizabeth Clark-Lewis earned her doctorate from the University of Maryland in 1984. She is associate professor; her specializations are public history and the history of African American Women. She has been most instrumental in establishing links between the Department and organizations like the Smithsonian Institution and the National Park Service. Among her publications include First Freed, African Americans and Emancipation in Washington, D. C. (Black Classic Press, 1997)" For a Real Better Life': Gender Race and Migration, 1900-1930," in Urban Odyssey, Cary and Jordan, eds. (Smithsonian Institution Press 1996). Living In, Living Out: African American Domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 (Smithsonian Institution Press November 1994).

Dr. David H. De Leon

Dr. David H. De Leon is associate professor. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1972. His areas of specialization are intellectual and social reform and religion in American life. He is at present director of graduate studies. He is the editor of leaders from the 1960s: A Biographical Sourcebook of American Activism (Greenwood Press, 1994) and Reinventing Anarchy: What are Anarchists Thinking These Days (Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979). Dr. De Leon is the author of Everything is Changing: Contemporary U.S. Movements in Historical Perspective (Praeger, 1988).

Dr. Balaram Dey

Dr. Balaram Dey is professor of geography. He joined the history department when geography and history were fused. His specialities are physical geography, environmental studies, climatology and hydrology. Dr. Dey has over sixty publications; his articles have appeared in the Canadian Geographer, Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology, Monthly Weather Review, Journal of Geophysical Research and the Journal of Glaciology.

Dr. Joseph Harris

Dr. Joseph Harris is distinguished professor of African history. He earned his doctorate from Northwestern University in 1966. …

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